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Latest Mouse-eared bats Stories

Social Bats More Likely To Pay Higher Price From White-nose Syndrome
2012-07-04 08:13:54

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online New studies conducted by biologists at University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) show that the effects of white-nose syndrome, a deadly bat disease, may be worse in bat colonies who are increasingly social during hibernation. The study found that bat species that tend to cluster together during hibernation, even with declining populations, would continue to spread white-nose syndrome. In 2006, white-nose syndrome made a dramatic...

Journey Of Little Brown Bats Tracked By Chemical 'Fingerprinting'
2012-05-31 03:41:52

Little brown bats are tiny creatures that fly through the night hunting insects that humans consider pests, zooming past trees in a wave of sleek brown fur. The 3.4 inch long bats, when not hunting insects in warmer months, hibernate in abandoned mines and caves during the winter. As peaceful as this image seems, a disease known as white-nose syndrome jeopardizes the little brown bat´s very survival.  A groundbreaking method of tracking the little brown bat by using stable...

Cases Confirmed Of White-nose Syndrome in Endangered Gray Bats
2012-05-31 03:32:58

White-nose syndrome (WNS) has devastated bat populations throughout eastern North America since its discovery in New York in 2006. This disease, which has advanced into nineteen states and four Canada provinces, has even devastated entire colonies of bats in some regions. Common symptoms include gathering near hibernating dens, and flying about during the cold days of winter. Bats have been found dying and ill on the ground outside of their hibernating areas. Recently, the U.S. Fish and...

2012-04-12 23:01:13

Two Bucknell professors have received a U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service grant to find out whether certain genetic characteristics, behavior and environmental factors contribute to the severity of the white-nose syndrome, which has killed up to 6.7 million bats in eastern North America. LEWISBURG, Pa. (PRWEB) April 12, 2012 Two Bucknell University biologists are leading an investigation into how and why some bats survive — and others die — when exposed to the tell-tale fungus...

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2011-06-29 11:21:12

Two bat species found in the US are another step closer to being declared an endangered species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, reprots the Associated Press (AP). Dying off from a devastating fungus that has killed off caves full of bats, the very existence of two bat species is in jeopardy. The agency is launching a 90-day investigation into whether the eastern small-footed bat and the northern long-eared bat need protection under the Endangered Species Act. The two species would be...

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2011-06-01 08:17:44

University of Calgary research finds urban life not healthy for bats In the treeless, flat Prairie, you'd think a city would provide a good home for bats who like to snuggle up and roost in trees and buildings. But researchers at the University of Calgary made the surprising discovery that the urban landscape is far from ideal for these animals. "I was really surprised," says Dr. Joanna Coleman, a sessional lecturer and recent PhD graduate in biological sciences at the University of Calgary...

2011-04-01 10:50:00

BOSTON, April 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Thomas Kunz, Warren Distinguished Professor in Boston University's Department of Biology, has coauthored an analysis published this week in the journal Science that shows how declines of bat populations caused by a new wildlife disease and fatalities at industrial-scale wind turbines could lead to substantial economic losses on the farm. Natural pest-control services provided by insect-eating bats in the United States likely save the U.S....

2011-03-03 12:35:57

All night long, bats swoop over our landscape consuming insects, but they do this in secret, hidden from our view.  Until recently, scientists have been unable to bring their ecosystem out of the dark but thanks to new genetic techniques, researchers from the University of Bristol and Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Canada, have been able to reconstruct the environment supporting these elusive creatures. Working at three sites in Southern Ontario (Canada) the team of students and...

2011-02-03 17:41:30

Scientists suggest a roadmap to tackle disease which has killed over 1 million bats Conservationists across the United States are racing to discover a solution to White-Nose Syndrome, a disease that is threatening to wipe out bat species across North America. A review published in Conservation Biology reveals that although WNS has already killed one million bats, there are critical knowledge gaps preventing researchers from combating the disease. WNS is a fatal disease that targets...

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2010-08-06 06:30:00

One of North America's most common bat species faces extinction in the northeastern U.S. within the next two decades due to a rapidly spreading disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), according to a new study led by researchers at the Boston University College of Arts & Sciences. The threatened bats, known as little brown myotis, are critical in controlling insects that spread disease to humans and animals.  The bats have been known to consume their own weight in insects in a...


Latest Mouse-eared bats Reference Libraries

Greater mouse-eared bat, Myotis myotis
2013-10-11 08:16:26

The greater mouse-eared bat is primarily found throughout Europe. It weighs about 1.6 ounces, has a wingspan of 14-18 inches and its body is 3-3.5 inches long. The Greater mouse-eared bat has a medium brown upper-body and a greyish belly. This species of bat does not use echolocation for hunting but rather catches its prey from the ground and water surfaces, a process known as gleaning. It finds its prey by listening for the noises that these animals usually make. Its menu consists of...

Brandt’s Bat, Myitus brandtii
2013-10-11 08:07:41

The Brandt’s bat has a large population in northwest of England but is endangered in Austria. The Brandt’s Bat has shaggy brown fur with a pale grey belly. This bat is not a large bat and weighs less than half an ounce and measures up to two inches long. Its wingspan is more than triple its body length at 7.5 to 9.5 inches. Brandt’s bat eats only insects (insectivorous) and is not blind. However, echolocation is used for “night-vision,” so that while hunting at night it does...

Lesser mouse-eared bat, Myotis blythii
2013-09-27 10:50:24

Populations have been found in southern Europe, southern central Europe and southwestern Asia. The lesser mouse-eared bat is a very social species therefore they travel and remain in groups rather than individually. These groups can be as large as 500 bats and could be mixed with the greater mouse-eared bat. Their feeding habitats are scrub areas, grasslands, farmland, and some gardens. It eats grass crickets and cockchafers. These insects are hunted by the lesser mouse-eared bat while...

Common Bent-wing bat, Miniopterus schreibersii
2013-09-18 15:24:07

This species is part of the largest group of bats in the Vespertilionidae family and are found in subtropical regions such as Australia, Ethiopia, Europe and some Asian areas. Large caves or mines are ideal locations where colonies ranging from a few dozen to several million can hibernate. Hibernation lasts for about 12 days. Colonies will migrate several times a year depending on the weather patterns and as far away as 520 miles. Although the Common Bent-wing Bat is dependent on...

Indiana Bat, Myotis sodalist
2012-10-05 08:36:41

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalist) is a mouse-eared bat that can be found in North America. Its range primarily includes eastern and Midwestern states, but it can be found in some southern areas of the United States. During the winter, its range becomes much smaller, with most populations occurring in large clusters in only a few caves. One study conducted in 1985 suggested that an estimated 244,000 individuals of this species reside in Indiana. Its range overlaps that of the endangered gray...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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