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Latest Mucin Stories

2014-06-20 23:06:36

Japanese Study Indicates Decreased Tear Film Mucin Levels in Dry Eye Similar to Computer Eye Strain Mucin Levels Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) June 20, 2014 New research supports what radio host and water researcher and entrepreneur Sharon Kleyne has been teaching for years – that computer eye strain is a form of dry eye disease with similar symptoms resulting from similar physiological changes in the eyes’ tear film. The Osaka, Japan study, comparing levels of the tear film’s mucin...

Sweet Tooth In Gut Bacteria Helps Keep Us Healthy
2013-10-27 05:07:45

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online It may not be good for your health if you have too much of a “sweet tooth,” but it’s an entirely different story when it comes to some strains of gut bacteria, according to new research appearing in Friday’s edition of the open-access, peer reviewed scientific journal PLoS ONE. Researchers from the Institute of Food Research looked at the interaction between those bacteria, which help us digest the food that we eat and...

2013-08-28 23:26:34

Australian scientists believe they may have found a new way to gauge the prognosis for people with peritoneal mesothelioma. Details of the study appear on Surviving Mesothelioma. Raleigh, NC (PRWEB) August 28, 2013 A team of researchers at Australia’s University of New South Wales say MUC1, a glycoprotein found on the outer surface of epithelial cells, is overexpressed in peritoneal mesothelioma. MUC1 is a mucin, a type of protein that helps protect the body against infection by binding...

2013-04-12 16:06:55

A new technique based on atomic force microscopy was developed at the Institute of Food Research to help ℠read´ information encoded in the gut lining. The lining of our gut is an important barrier between the outside world and our bodies. Laid out, the gut lining would cover the area of a football pitch. It must let nutrients from our foods through, but prevent invasion by disease-causing bacteria, at the same time hosting the trillions of beneficial bacteria needed for proper...

2012-07-30 12:57:20

Findings may affect how doctors treat allergic inflammation and organ transplant rejection A research team led by Xian Chang Li, MD, PhD, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) Transplantation Research Center, has shed light on how a population of lymphocytes, called CD4+ T cells, mature into various subsets of adult T helper cells. In particular, the team uncovered that a particular cell surface molecule, known as OX40, is a powerful inducer of new T helper cells that make copious amounts of...

2012-05-03 15:10:40

Presentations at the 4th IMPAKT Breast Cancer Conference New findings presented at Europe's leading breast cancer translational research conference this year shed new light on the many biological differences between individual breast cancers. Focused on the biological features that make tumors more or less sensitive to important therapies, the new studies will help doctors make crucial choices about the most appropriate treatment for millions of patients. "Despite major advances in...

2012-04-25 12:10:36

Scientists are reporting that the mucus lining the stomachs of pigs could be a long-sought, abundant source of "mucins" being considered for use as broad-spectrum anti-viral agents to supplement baby formula and for use in personal hygiene and other consumer products to protect against a range of viral infections. In the report, Katharina Ribbeck and colleagues point out that mucus, which coats the inside of the nose, mouth and vagina, is the immune system's first line of defense. The...

2012-03-08 15:01:28

Scientists from the Schepens Eye Research Institute, a subsidiary of Mass. Eye and Ear and affiliate of Harvard Medical School, have found for the first time that a bacterial pathogen can literally mow down protective molecules, known as mucins, on mucus membranes to enter and infect a part of the body. Their landmark study, published in the March 7, 2012 PLoS ONE, describes how they discovered that an "epidemic" strain of the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes conjunctivitis,...

2011-10-11 09:15:53

World class scientist Professor Willem M. de Vos will explain next Monday how the microbes that are closest to our hearts — gut microbes — could underpin a new way of thinking about human biology. As well as looking at our own genes, we can now include those of our microbes in studies of human health and disease. This is a significant shift in the way we approach human biology. Gut microbes affect our health by producing vitamins, priming our immune system and contributing to...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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