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Latest Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis Stories

2004-11-27 03:00:10

Laboratorians have been on the front lines in the fight against tuberculosis (TB) ever since Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of the tuberculosis bacillus in 1882. The bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M tuberculosis) has a high concentration of lipids in the cell wall, which makes it the ultimate survivor. It is impermeable to stains and dyes, resistant to many antibiotics, resistant to killing by acidic and alkaline compounds, resistant to osmotic lysis via complement deposition,...

2004-11-25 03:00:15

As children acquire infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis from adults in their environment, the epidemiology of childhood tuberculosis (TB) follows that in adults. While global burden of childhood tuberculosis is unclear, in developing countries the annual risk of tuberculosis infection in children is 2- 5 per cent. Nearly 8-20 per cent of the deaths caused by tuberculosis occur in children. It has been suggested that BCG vaccination is responsible for decrease in the occurrence of...

2004-11-25 03:00:15

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin with or without resistance to other drugs is among the most worrisome elements of the pandemic of antibiotic resistance. Globally, about three per cent of all newly diagnosed patients have MDR-TB. The proportion is higher in patients who have previously received antituberculosis treatment reflecting the failure of programmes designed to ensure complete cure of patients...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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