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Latest muscle contraction Stories

2013-05-01 13:03:56

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) significantly improves muscle function — down to the muscle fiber level — in postmenopausal women, a new study published today [1 May] in The Journal of Physiology shows. Some studies published over the last decade have led to negative publicity around HRT, a treatment used to relieve symptoms of menopause, resulting in many women being reluctant to use it. However this new study offers a positive outcome from the treatment. Previous...

2013-02-26 11:43:28

Study identifies possible therapeutic target to treat asthma and COPD New research examines the role of PKC in airway smooth muscle contraction and raises the possibility that this enzyme could be a therapeutic target for treating asthma, COPD, and other lung diseases. In the lungs, pathological increases in the contraction of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) lining airway walls–a process that decreases airflow–contribute to the chain of events leading to asthma and COPD, two...

2012-07-20 01:55:31

Max Planck scientists bring the basis of muscle movement into sharper focus Muscle contraction and many other movement processes are controlled by the interplay between myosin and actin filaments. Two further proteins, tropomyosin and troponin, regulate how myosin binds to actin. While theoretical models have in fact described exactly how these muscle proteins interact, this interaction has never previously been observed in detail. Stefan Raunser and Elmar Behrmann from the Max Planck...

2012-01-30 12:36:51

A new study in the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org) uses state-of-the-art fluorescence microscopy to provide a striking 3-D picture of how class V myosins (myoV) "walk" along their actin track. The myosin superfamily of mechanoenzymes, more commonly referred to as molecular motors, play an important role in muscle contraction and other basic cellular processes. MyoV, one of the most highly studied molecular motors, has the ability to travel long distances by taking multiple...

Experimental 'Couch Potato Pill' May Also Prevent Heat Stroke
2012-01-09 14:12:48

According to a new study in the journal Nature Medicine, an experimental treatment known as the 'couch potato pill' may also help to prevent heatstroke in people genetically predisposed to it. The pill first received its name due its ability to mimic the effects of exercise in inactive laboratory mice, eliciting much excitement in the medical community that it might eventually prove useful in activity-disinclined human patients as well. Yet new research shows that the drug, known to...

2011-12-21 13:07:40

New research hopes to explain premature births and failed inductions of labor. The study by academics at the University of Bristol suggests a new mechanism by which the level of myosin phosphorylation is regulated in the pregnant uterus. The researchers, Dr Claire Hudson and Professor Andrés López Bernal in the School of Clinical Sciences and Dr Kate Heesom in the University Proteomics Facility and the School of Biochemistry, have discovered that phosphorylation...

2011-04-19 15:02:12

New insight into the physiology of cardiac muscle may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies that exploit an inherent protective state of the heart. The research, published by Cell Press online on April 19th in the Biophysical Journal, discovers a state of cardiac muscle that exhibits a low metabolic rate and may help to regulate energy use and promote efficiency in this hard-working and vital organ. Muscle cells are highly specialized cells that are able to physically contract and...

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2011-04-12 11:20:00

X-rays shed new light on the regulation of muscle contraction In a famous experiment first performed more than 220 years ago, Italian physician Luigi Galvani discovered that the muscles of a frog's leg twitch when an electric voltage is applied. An international group of scientists from Italy, the UK and France has now brought this textbook classic into the era of nanoscience. They used a powerful new synchrotron X-ray technique to observe for the first time at the molecular scale how muscle...

2010-11-04 18:03:25

Calcium regulates many critical processes within the body, including muscle contraction, the heartbeat, and the release of hormones. But too much calcium can be a bad thing. In excess, it can lead to a host of diseases, such as severe muscle weakness, a fatal reaction to anesthesia or sudden cardiac death. Now, using intense X-rays from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have determined the...

2010-08-26 12:57:12

Findings add new dimension to how memories are encoded, suggest new therapeutic targets Functioning much like gears in a machine, cellular motor proteins are critical to dynamic functions throughout the body, including muscle contraction, cell migration and cellular growth processes. Now, neuroscientists from UC Irvine and the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute report that motor proteins also play a critical role in the stabilization of long-term memories. The findings add an...


Latest muscle contraction Reference Libraries

Muscle
2013-04-30 14:32:22

Muscle is soft tissue that is filled with protein filaments that manipulates the shape of a cell which can help with posture, movement and functions of other organs in the body such as the lungs and heart as well as the digestive tract. Formation and Orientation There are three different types of muscle tissues; skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscles. Skeletal muscle is used to hold together and monitor skeletal movements. Posture is mainly controlled by skeletal muscles located along...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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