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Latest Myc Stories

2014-06-25 11:27:24

University of Minnesota Gene partnership may be fueling cancer spread in as much as 20 percent of cancers A key cancer-causing gene, responsible for up to 20 percent of cancers, may have a weak spot in its armor, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. The partnership of MYC, a gene long linked to cancer, and a non-coding RNA, PVT1, could be the key to understanding how MYC fuels cancer cells. The research is published in the latest issue...

2014-05-27 15:08:14

EMBL How long-distance control impacts face formation Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, have identified how a specific stretch of DNA controls far-off genes to influence the formation of the face. The study, published today in Nature Genetics, helps understand the genetic causes of cleft lip and cleft palate, which are among the most common congenital malformations in humans. “This genomic region ultimately controls genes which determine...

2014-05-07 08:54:14

Each time a human cell divides, it must first make a copy of its 46 chromosomes to serve as an instruction manual for the new cell. Normally, this process goes off without a hitch. But from time to time, the information isn't copied and collated properly, leaving gaps or breaks that the cell has to carefully combine back together. Researchers have long recognized that some regions of the chromosome,called "fragile sites," are more prone to breakage and can be a breeding ground for human...

2014-03-27 04:20:51

Studies Identify PI3K Pathway Combinations and MYC Driven Cancers SAN DIEGO and NEW TAIPEI CITY, Taiwan, March 27, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Senhwa Biosciences, Inc. announced today that results from research with its first-in-class Pol I inhibitor, CX-5461, will be presented at the 2014 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting held on April 5-9 in San Diego, CA. Prof. Ross Hannan and Prof. Rick Pearson of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC) will present...

2014-03-17 23:23:11

Scientists say patients with certain forms of aggressive Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma are more likely to survive if they respond well to their first treatment. Raleigh, NC (PRWEB) March 17, 2014 An article published in the journal Cancer and reported by the Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Center sheds new light on the prognosis for patients with certain forms of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Doctors with the James Comprehensive Cancer Center at Ohio State University focused on two specific subtypes of...

2014-01-08 17:07:21

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered a promising strategy for treating cancers that are caused by one of the most common cancer-causing changes in cells. The discovery offers hope for treating many types of cancer that are driven to grow and spread through the actions of a cancer-causing protein called MYC. Up to 70 per cent of human cancers, including many leukemias and lymphomas, have unusually high levels of MYC, which causes cancerous changes in cells by...

2013-11-27 15:37:32

Discovery also reveals how a drug, now in multiple human trials, halts production of Myc protein and stops progression of AML A team of researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has identified a leukemia-specific stretch of DNA called an enhancer element that enables cancerous blood cells to proliferate in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), a devastating cancer that is incurable in 70% of patients. Just as important, the findings offer a mechanistic insight into how a new class of...

2013-11-04 16:21:59

Tumors become highly malignant when they acquire the ability to colonize other tissues and form metastases. LMU researchers have identified a factor that promotes metastasis of colon tumors – and presents a possible target for therapy. The protein c-MYC is referred to as a master regulator because it controls the activity of hundreds of genes, including many that drive cell growth and cell proliferation. Genetic changes that perturb its own regulation therefore have serious consequences...

Deleting One Gene In Fungus Reveals New Compounds With Antibiotic Potential
2013-11-01 08:42:09

Oregon State University Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered that one gene in a common fungus acts as a master regulator, and deleting it has opened access to a wealth of new compounds that have never before been studied – with the potential to identify new antibiotics. The finding was announced today in the journal PLOS Genetics, in research supported by the National Institutes of Health and the American Cancer Society. Scientists succeeded in flipping a genetic...

2013-08-09 10:15:15

A small group of immune-regulating molecules, when overproduced even moderately, can trigger the blood cancers known as lymphomas, according to a new study led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). The six “microRNA” molecules were already known to be overproduced in lymphomas and in many other human cancers, but no one had demonstrated that they can be the prime cause of such cancers—until now. The new study also identified the major biological pathways through...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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