Quantcast

Latest Myofibroblast Stories

2013-11-11 11:00:52

Uni of Edinburgh news release Patients with damaged organs could be helped by new treatments after scientists have discovered how tissues scar. Researchers say that the finding could pave the way for new drugs and eventually reduce the number of patients on organ transplant waiting lists. Fibrotic diseases occur in many tissues within the body – including the liver, lung or kidneys – and have a range of causes including viruses or toxins. Experts say that the main source of scar...

2013-11-11 10:28:31

Nature Medicine paper pinpoints where, how to intervene A team of scientists that includes Saint Louis University researchers has identified a new way to intervene in the molecular and cellular cascade that causes fibrosis – a condition where the body's natural process of forming scars for wound healing goes into overdrive and causes diseases. The findings, published Nov. 10 in the advance online issue of Nature Medicine, demonstrate a potential novel therapeutic approach to treat...

2012-05-07 20:35:33

Research with mice reveals possible strategy to reverse fibrosis in liver and other organs An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, report that significant numbers of myofibroblasts — cells that produce the fibrous scarring in chronic liver injury — revert to an inactive phenotype as the liver heals. The discovery in mouse models could ultimately help lead to new human therapies for reversing fibrosis...

2011-08-02 12:19:13

A synthesised compound which is also found in bear bile could help prevent disturbances in the heart's normal rhythm, according to research published today in the journal Hepatology by a team from Imperial College London. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is manufactured as a drug to decrease production of cholesterol in the body and to dissolve gallstones. It is also present in many traditional Chinese medicines made from bear bile. The new study suggests it could also potentially treat abnormal...

2011-06-29 06:59:24

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) affects about 100,000 people in the U.S. each year and is fatal within three years of diagnosis. An invasive cell that leads to lung fibrosis may be stopped by cutting off its supply of sugar, according to this study. IPF has only one therapy in the U. S.: lung transplantation. Duke researchers have found a possible new treatment by identifying a cell surface receptor on the invasive cells called myofibroblasts and an enzyme that...

2011-06-27 15:09:52

An invasive cell that leads to fibrosis of the lungs may be stopped by cutting off its supply of sugar, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which affects about 100,000 people in the U.S. each year and leads to death within three years of diagnosis, has only one therapy in the U. S.: lung transplantation. Duke researchers have found a possible new treatment by identifying a cell surface receptor on the invasive cells called...

2011-02-25 12:50:47

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report Study Highlights:     * A protein called fibronectin-EDA was linked to heart muscle damage after a heart attack in an animal study.    * Mice genetically altered to lack FN-EDA had less heart damage after a heart attack.    * Researchers suggest these findings hold potential for therapies to reduce or prevent heart muscle damage after a heart attack. Scientists have identified a protein that...

2010-12-20 19:03:06

In the latest of a series of related papers, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Austria and elsewhere, present a new and more definitive explanation of how fibrotic cells form, multiply and eventually destroy the human liver, resulting in cirrhosis. In doing so, the findings upend the standing of a long-presumed marker for multiple fibrotic diseases and reveal the existence of a previously unknown kind of inflammatory white blood...

2009-06-01 09:29:25

In-growth and new generation of blood vessels, which must take place if a wound is to heal or a tumor is to grow, have been thought to occur through a branching and further growth of a vessel against a chemical gradient of growth factors. Now a research team at Uppsala University and its University Hospital has shown that mechanical forces are considerably more important than was previously thought. The findings, published today in the journal Nature Medicine, open up a new field for...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
Related