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Latest Nanomedicine Stories

2012-01-09 20:01:58

Honing chemotherapy delivery to cancer cells is a challenge for many researchers. Getting the cancer cells to take the chemotherapy "bait" is a greater challenge. But perhaps such a challenge has not been met with greater success than by the nanotechnology research team of Omid Farokhzad, MD, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) Department of Anesthesiology Perioperative and Pain Medicine and Research. In their latest study with researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)...

2011-12-23 10:53:35

Many imaging technologies and their contrast agents – chemicals used during scans to help detect tumors and other problems – involve exposure to radiation or heavy metals, which present potential health risks to patients and limit the ways they can be applied. In an effort to mitigate these drawbacks, new research from University of Pennsylvania engineers shows a way to coat an iron-based contrast agent so that it only interacts with the acidic environment of tumors, making it...

2011-12-19 16:21:13

Testing the effectiveness of new pharmaceuticals may get faster thanks to a new technique incorporating quantum dots developed at the University of Central Florida. Some drug testing can take a decade or more, but UCF associate professor Swadeshmukul Santra and his team have created an electronic quantum dots (Qdots) probe that "lights up" when a drug it is delivering attaches to cancer cells. The research appears online in this month's Biomaterials....

2011-11-29 16:50:09

Coating the surface of an implant such as a new hip or pacemaker with nanosized metallic particles reduces the risk of rejection, and researchers at the University of Gothenburg can now explain why: they fool the innate immune system. The results are presented in the International Journal of Nanomedicine. “Activation of the body´s innate immune system is one of the most common reasons for an implant being rejected,” explains Professor Hans Elwing from the University of...

2011-11-29 11:31:24

A study led by a group of Nanyang Technological University (NTU) researchers has found that a chemical commonly used in consumer products can potentially cause cancer. The chemical, Zinc Oxide, is used to absorb harmful ultra violet light. But when it is turned into nano-sized particles, they are able to enter human cells and may damage the user's DNA. This in turn activates a protein called p53, whose duty is to prevent damaged cells from multiplying and becoming cancerous. However, cells...

2011-11-18 02:45:31

Recent studies conducted at Marshall University have demonstrated that nanoparticles of cerium oxide–common diesel fuel additives used to increase the fuel efficiency of automobile engines–can travel from the lungs to the liver and that this process is associated with liver damage. The data in the study by Dr. Eric R. Blough and his colleagues at Marshall´s Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems indicate there is a dose-dependent increase in the concentration of cerium in the...

2011-11-17 10:32:52

The metabolism of lung cancer patients is different than the metabolism of healthy people. And so the molecules that make up cancer patients´ exhaled breath are different too. A new device pioneered at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and Nobel-Prize-winning Technion University in Haifa, Israel uses gold nanoparticles to trap and define these molecules in exhaled breath. By comparing these molecular signatures to control groups, the device can tell not only if a lung is...

2011-11-17 03:19:33

Is the emerging field of nanomedicine a breathtaking technological revolution that promises remarkable new ways of diagnosing and treating diseases? Or does it portend the release of dangerous nanoparticles, nanorobots or nanoelectronic devices that will wreak havoc in the body? A new review of more than 500 studies on the topic concludes that neither scenario is likely. It appears in ACS' journal Molecular Pharmaceutics. Ruth Duncan and Rogerio Gaspar explain that nanomedicine - the...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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