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Latest Nanomedicine Stories

2012-04-09 09:51:29

Combining two strategies designed to improve the results of cancer treatment — antiangiogenesis drugs and nanomedicines — may only be successful if the smallest nanomedicines are used. A new study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers, appearing in Nature Nanotechnology, finds that normalizing blood vessels within tumors, which improves the delivery of standard chemotherapy drugs, can block the delivery of larger nanotherapy molecules. "We found that vascular...

2012-04-09 09:46:25

Rice teams with MD Anderson, Baylor College of Medicine to explore drug and gene delivery Using light-harvesting nanoparticles to convert laser energy into “plasmonic nanobubbles,” researchers at Rice University, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) are developing new methods to inject drugs and genetic payloads directly into cancer cells. In tests on drug-resistant cancer cells, the researchers found that delivering...

2012-04-05 21:05:31

Gold nanostars first to deliver drug directly to cancer cell nucleus Nanotechnology offers powerful new possibilities for targeted cancer therapies, but the design challenges are many. Northwestern University scientists now are the first to develop a simple but specialized nanoparticle that can deliver a drug directly to a cancer cell's nucleus -- an important feature for effective treatment. They also are the first to directly image at nanoscale dimensions how nanoparticles interact...

2012-04-05 09:21:12

A paradigm shift in anti-tumor efficacy and safety in cancer patients A team of scientists, engineers and physicians from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), Harvard Medical School (HMS), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), BIND Biosciences, Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Wayne State University Karmanos Cancer Institute, and Weill Cornell Medical College have found promising effects of a first-in-class targeted cancer drug...

2012-03-27 10:37:25

Innovative TAU tool for immune system activation could lead to better drug delivery Developing a drug or vaccine requires a delicate balancing act with the immune system. On one hand, medications need to escape detection by the immune system in order to perform their function. But vaccinations – de-activated versions of a disease or virus – need to do the reverse. They prompt the immune system to create protective antibodies. But scientists are still stumped by how the immune...

2012-01-26 12:21:39

A new system for delivering a drug to organ transplant patients, which could avoid the risk of harmful side effects, is being developed by scientists at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow. The drug, cyclosporine (CsA), is widely used in transplant operations and helps prevent the patient's body rejecting the organ but it can cause adverse drug reactions, of which the most serious problems are kidney and liver damage, in the doses which are currently administered in the long term....

2012-01-09 20:01:58

Honing chemotherapy delivery to cancer cells is a challenge for many researchers. Getting the cancer cells to take the chemotherapy "bait" is a greater challenge. But perhaps such a challenge has not been met with greater success than by the nanotechnology research team of Omid Farokhzad, MD, Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) Department of Anesthesiology Perioperative and Pain Medicine and Research. In their latest study with researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)...

2011-12-23 10:53:35

Many imaging technologies and their contrast agents – chemicals used during scans to help detect tumors and other problems – involve exposure to radiation or heavy metals, which present potential health risks to patients and limit the ways they can be applied. In an effort to mitigate these drawbacks, new research from University of Pennsylvania engineers shows a way to coat an iron-based contrast agent so that it only interacts with the acidic environment of tumors, making it...

2011-12-19 16:21:13

Testing the effectiveness of new pharmaceuticals may get faster thanks to a new technique incorporating quantum dots developed at the University of Central Florida. Some drug testing can take a decade or more, but UCF associate professor Swadeshmukul Santra and his team have created an electronic quantum dots (Qdots) probe that "lights up" when a drug it is delivering attaches to cancer cells. The research appears online in this month's Biomaterials....


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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