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Latest Nanoparticle Stories

Nanoscale Optical Switch Invented
2014-03-14 15:31:09

David Salisbury, Vanderbilt University An ultra-fast and ultra-small optical switch has been invented that could advance the day when photons replace electrons in the innards of consumer products ranging from cell phones to automobiles. The new optical device can turn on and off trillions of times per second. It consists of individual switches that are only one five-hundredth the width of a human hair (200 nanometers) in diameter. This size is much smaller than the current generation...

2014-03-10 16:32:02

LONDON, March 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com just published a new market research report: Top Technologies in Health and Wellness This research service provides a list of key technology trends in health and wellness that are likely to have an impact in the year 2013 until 2017. The slides provide a brief snapshot of the technology, the key benefits or strengths, trends and initiatives, key stakeholders and their solutions, applications, enabling technologies, insights and...

2014-03-03 15:25:51

Researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed an innovative cancer-fighting technique in which custom-designed nanoparticles carry chemotherapy drugs directly to tumor cells and release their cargo when triggered by a two-photon laser in the infrared red wavelength. The research findings by UCLA's Jeffrey Zink, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and Fuyu Tamanoi, a professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics, and their colleagues were...

Frank Kjeldsen
2014-02-28 08:17:46

University of Southern Denmark Endocrine disrupters are not the only worrying chemicals that ordinary consumers are exposed to in everyday life. Also nanoparticles of silver, found in e.g. dietary supplements, cosmetics and food packaging, now worry scientists. A new study from the University of Southern Denmark shows that nano-silver can penetrate our cells and cause damage. Silver has an antibacterial effect and therefore the food and cosmetic industry often coat their products with...

2014-02-27 18:44:13

It’s an odd twist. For scientists to determine if a cell is functioning properly, they must destroy it. This is what happens in X-ray fluorescence microscopy when biological specimens are exposed to ionizing radiation, which provides images with a level of detail that conventional microscopes just can’t match. This exposure can change what is being imaged in profound ways, possibly giving false accounts of how the cell actually works. To address this issue, researchers at the U.S....

when a pine-scented molecule combines with ozone in the surrounding air, some of the free radicals created in the process grab oxygen with unprecedented speed
2014-02-27 06:28:35

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For atmospheric scientists, pine forests are magical places where coniferous trees give off pine-scented vapors. These vapors form particles, rapidly and seemingly out of nowhere. A new study from an international group of scientists illuminates the process by which gas wafting from coniferous trees creates particles that can reflect sunlight or promote cloud formation. Both are important climate feedbacks. The findings, led by the...

2014-02-25 14:11:33

Rice University lab builds rig to evaluate oil, gas wells in fracturing operations A tabletop device invented at Rice University can tell how efficiently a nanoparticle would travel through a well and may provide a wealth of information for oil and gas producers. The device gathers data on how tracers – microscopic particles that can be pumped into and recovered from wells – move through deep rock formations that have been opened by hydraulic fracturing. Drilling companies use...

microscale thermogravimetric analysis
2014-02-25 06:25:25

Michael Baum, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have demonstrated that they can make sensitive chemical analyses of minute samples of nanoparticles by, essentially, roasting them on top of a quartz crystal. The NIST-developed technique, "microscale thermogravimetric analysis," holds promise for studying nanomaterials in biology and the environment, where...

Fighting Heart Disease With Sticky Nanoparticles
2014-02-19 06:53:07

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at Clemson University have developed a promising, non-invasive way to fight heart disease by using nanoparticles coated with a sticky protein to deliver drugs to clogged or damaged arteries. The researchers, led by Clemson bioengineering professor Naren Vyavahare, hope their breakthrough could someday supplement, or even replace, traditional heart disease treatments such as vascular stents, which hold blood vessels...

2014-02-14 23:00:05

ReportsnReports.com adds “Nanoelectronics: The Global Market” report to its research database. Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) February 15, 2014 This 240-page report from Future Markets, Inc. covers the raft of applications and end products enabled by nanotechnology and nanomaterials in the electronics sector. Report contents include technology development in the electronics sector utilizing the following materials: Nanoparticles, Carbon nanotubes, Fullerenes and POSS, Graphene, Nanofibers,...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.