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Latest Nanowire Stories

2010-10-14 13:41:03

Scientists at the University of Leeds have perfected a new technique that allows them to make molecular nanowires out of thin strips of ring-shaped molecules known as discotic liquid crystals (DLCs). The findings could be an important step in the development of next generation electronic devices, such as light-harvesting cells and low-cost biosensors that could be used to test water quality in developing countries. DLCs are disk-shaped molecules that are one of the more promising candidates...

2010-10-12 15:01:36

Specialized bacterial filaments shown to conduct electricity Some bacteria grow electrical hair that lets them link up in big biological circuits, according to a University of Southern California biophysicist and his collaborators. The finding suggests that microbial colonies may survive, communicate and share energy in part through electrically conducting hairs known as bacterial nanowires. "This is the first measurement of electron transport along biological nanowires produced by bacteria,"...

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2010-09-29 21:45:58

While refining their novel method for making nanoscale wires, chemists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) discovered an unexpected bonus"”a new way to create nanowires that produce light similar to that from light-emitting diodes (LEDs). These "nano-LEDs" may one day have their light-emission abilities put to work serving miniature devices such as nanogenerators or lab-on-a-chip systems.Nanowires typically are "grown" by the controlled deposition of...

2010-09-28 20:41:26

The second law of thermodynamics is a big hit with the beret-wearing college crowd because of its implicit existential crunch. The tendency of a closed systems to become increasingly disordered if no energy is added or removed is a popular, if not depressing, "things fall apart" sort-of-law that would seem to confirm the adolescent experience. Now a joint team of Ukrainian and American scientists has demanded more work and less poetry from the second law of thermodynamics, proposing a novel...

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2010-09-24 10:40:20

Silicon-based film may lead to efficient thermoelectric devices Computers, light bulbs, and even people generate heat"”energy that ends up being wasted. With a thermoelectric device, which converts heat to electricity and vice versa, you can harness that otherwise wasted energy. Thermoelectric devices are touted for use in new and efficient refrigerators, and other cooling or heating machines. But present-day designs are not efficient enough for widespread commercial use or are made...

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2010-09-18 07:40:42

The ability of phase-change materials to readily and swiftly transition between different phases has made them valuable as a low-power source of non-volatile or "flash" memory and data storage. Now an entire new class of phase-change materials has been discovered by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley that could be applied to phase change random access memory (PCM) technologies and possibly optical data...

2010-09-15 17:29:25

The PhD thesis by Carlos Echeverría Arrondo, Doctor in Physics from the Public University of Navarre and entitled "On doped semiconductor quantum dots and magnetic nanowires", studied the behaviour and properties of nanometric-scale semiconductor crystals. The interest aroused by nanoscience and nanotechnology spurred Dr Echeverría to study the behaviour of semiconductor crystals when their size is reduced to less than one hundred nanometres (a nanometre is...

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2010-09-13 06:15:00

U.S. researchers said Sunday that new artificial "skin" fashioned out of flexible semiconductor materials can sense touch, making it possible for robots to be able to grip eggs but be strong enough to hold a frying pan as well. Scientists have been struggling with a way to try and make robots be able to adjust the amount of force needed to hold different objects.  The pressure-sensitive materials are designed to help overcome that challenge. Ali Javey, an electrical engineer at the...

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2010-09-02 11:30:27

Strain-gating Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new class of electronic logic device in which current is switched by an electric field generated by the application of mechanical strain to zinc oxide nanowires. The devices, which include transistors and diodes, could be used in nanometer-scale robotics, nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and microfluidic devices. The mechanical action used to initiate the strain could...

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2010-08-31 08:54:09

By dipping plain cotton cloth in a high-tech broth full of silver nanowires and carbon nanotubes, Stanford researchers have developed a new high-speed, low-cost filter that could easily be implemented to purify water in the developing world. Instead of physically trapping bacteria as most existing filters do, the new filter lets them flow on through with the water. But by the time the pathogens have passed through, they have also passed on, because the device kills them with an electrical...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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