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Latest Nanowire Stories

2009-08-17 11:47:18

New data from Chinese-Danish collaboration shows that organic nanoscale wires could be an alternative to silicon in computer chips. The discovery has just been published in the respected scientific journal, Advanced Materials.Nanochemists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Nano-Science Center, Department of Chemistry have developed nanoscale electric contacts out of organic and inorganic nanowires. In the contact they have crossed the wires like Mikado sticks and coupled several...

2009-08-16 23:01:00

SAN JOSE, Calif., Aug. 17 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Today, scientists at IBM Research (NYSE: IBM) and the California Institute of Technology announced a scientific advancement that could be a major breakthrough in enabling the semiconductor industry to pack more power and speed into tiny computer chips, while making them more energy efficient and less expensive to manufacture. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090817/NY62155-a ) (Photo:...

2009-07-06 14:58:52

U.S. scientists say they've discovered table salt so brittle it crushes easily between a thumb and forefinger can become super-elastic in the nanoworld. Scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico said such elastic salt can stretch like taffy to twice its original length without breaking. Nathan Moore and colleagues made the discovery using a specially designed microscope while studying how water coats salt crystals. They said they detected an unusual attractive force between...

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2009-06-24 09:15:00

To stretch a supply of salt generally means using it sparingly.But researchers from Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Pittsburgh were startled when they found they had made the solid actually physically stretch."It's not supposed to do that," said Sandia principal investigator Jack Houston. "Unlike, say, gold, which is ductile and deforms under pressure, salt is brittle. Hit it with a hammer, it shatters like glass."That a block of salt can stretch rather than remain inert...

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2009-06-04 13:40:00

The unique properties of thin layers of graphite"”known as graphene"”make the material attractive for a wide range of potential electronic devices. Researchers have now experimentally demonstrated the potential for another graphene application: replacing copper for interconnects in future generations of integrated circuits.In a paper published in the June 2009 issue of the IEEE journal Electron Device Letters, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology report detailed...

2009-05-29 11:51:51

New device combines advances in synthetic antibody mimic proteins with advances in nanodesign Members of a USC-led research team say they've made a big improvement in a new breed of electronic detectors for viruses and other biological materials "” one that may be a valuable addition to the battle against epidemics. It consists of a piece of synthetic antibody attached to a nanowire that's attached to an electrical base, immersed in liquid. If the protein the antibody binds to is...

2009-05-28 11:25:05

A team of researchers at the University of Illinois has demonstrated that, counter to classical Newtonian mechanics, an entire collection of superconducting electrons in an ultrathin superconducting wire is able to "tunnel" as a pack from a state with a higher electrical current to one with a notably lower current, providing more evidence of the phenomenon of macroscopic quantum tunneling.Physics professors Alexey Bezryadin and Paul Goldbart led the team, with graduate student Mitrabhanu Sahu...

2009-05-11 08:00:00

PALO ALTO, Calif. and LONDON, May 11 /PRNewswire/ --Nanosys Inc. and QuantuMDx Group (QMDx) today announced that QMDx has signed a non-exclusive license agreement with Nanosys for several patents and patent applications related to the use of nanowires for biosensors. The core intellectual property involves the use of nanowire-based field effect transistors (FETs) as biosensors, which were derived from the work of Dr. Charles Lieber, a professor of chemistry at Harvard, a pioneer in...

2009-05-06 08:52:35

 Researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), in collaboration with researchers from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), have demonstrated, for the first time, that the activation energy of impurities in semiconductor nanowires is affected by the surrounding dielectric and can be modified by the choice of the nanowire embedding medium.The finding, published in the April 6 issue of Applied Physics Letters, helps to confirm the "dielectric confinement...

2009-04-21 08:06:38

 Researchers at the University of Illinois have found a new way to make transistors smaller and faster. The technique uses self-assembled, self-aligned, and defect-free nanowire channels made of gallium arsenide.In a paper to appear in the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) journal Electron Device Letters, U. of I. electrical and computer engineering professor Xiuling Li and graduate research assistant Seth Fortuna describe the first metal-semiconductor field-effect...