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Latest Narwhal Stories

2014-03-27 23:01:44

Researcher to offer insights into these "unicorns of the sea" and the purpose of their long spiraling tusks. Norwalk, CT (PRWEB) March 27, 2014 It’s only natural that Dr. Martin Nweeia, a dentist in Sharon, CT, has an interest in teeth. But he has a particular interest in a tooth of note: the long single spiraling tusk of the mysterious, almost mythical narwhal. One of the top narwhal researchers in the country, Nweeia will share what he has learned about “the unicorns of...

2014-03-17 23:01:13

The Connecticut attraction is displaying a 7-foot narwhal tusk in advance of an April 7 lecture by an expert on these "unicorns of the sea." Norwalk, CT (PRWEB) March 17, 2014 Visitors to The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk can check out a rare 7-foot narwhal tusk that’s on loan to the Connecticut attraction now through April 7. Cousins to beluga whales, narwhals are called “the unicorns of the sea” because of their single spiraling tusks. The tusk is on exhibit at The...

2014-02-06 16:22:24

Narwhal for Ice Management Recognized by Panel of E&P Industry Experts HOUSTON, Feb. 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- ION Geophysical Corporation (NYSE:IO) today announced that its new Narwhal(TM) for Ice Management software received a Spotlight on Arctic Technology award, to be presented at the Arctic Technology Conference in Houston on Monday, February 10. The Arctic Technology Conference (ATC) shines the spotlight on the latest innovations in the Arctic E&P industry with its annual...

Image 1 - Ancient Whales Tell The Story Of Their Modern Relatives
2012-03-23 11:09:33

Smithsonian scientists have recently described a new species of toothed whale that once lived in warm climates during the Pliocene era 3-4 million years ago. These whales may have possibly been a close relative to the modern day Beluga and Narwhal. Those happy looking whales, the Beluga and Narwhal, live exclusively in colder climates like the Arctic and sub-arctic. The challenge now for the scientists is to uncover the mystery of why the whales moved farther north when once they were...

What Do Killer Whales Eat In The Arctic?
2012-01-30 09:36:54

Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are the top marine predator, wherever they are found, and seem to eat everything from schools of small fish to large baleen whales, over twice their own size. The increase in hunting territories available to killer whales in the Arctic due to climate change and melting sea ice could seriously affect the marine ecosystem balance. New research published in BioMed Central's re-launched open access journal Aquatic Biosystems has combined scientific observations with...

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2010-10-28 08:56:28

Proof-of-Concept Study Published in Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans In a research paper published online Saturday in the Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans, a publication of the American Geological Union (AGU), scientists reported the southern Baffin Bay off West Greenland has continued warming since wintertime ocean temperatures were last effectively measured there in the early 2000s. Temperatures in the study were collected by narwhals, medium-sized toothed Arctic whales, during...

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2010-04-07 12:32:37

Habitat information important to track as ocean waters warm New research is shedding light on the preferred habitat of the northern squid, Gonatus fabricii - a key but often overlooked species in Arctic marine food webs. Squid, along with octopus and bobtail squid (Rossia spp.), play an important role as prey in Arctic waters for species such as narwhal, beluga, seals, cod and Greenland halibut. But, says Kathleen Gardiner, a PhD candidate in the Biological Sciences Department of the...

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2010-04-07 09:45:29

New aerial survey techniques lead to increased narwhal estimates Improvements in aerial survey methods have led to increased estimates of narwhal populations in the eastern Arctic, according to a paper published Arctic, the journal of the University of Calgary's Arctic Institute of North America. Previous estimates of narwhals were based on surface counts and covered part of their eastern Arctic summering range. They placed populations between 20,000 and 30,000. New estimates increase that...

2008-06-10 17:09:35

Chemicals produced by humans have been found in deep-sea squid and other creatures, further evidence that contaminants make their way deep into the marine food web, scientists said Monday. Researchers found a variety of chemical contaminants in nine species of cephalopods, which include octopods, squids, cuttlefishes and nautiluses. These species are food for dolphins, narwhals, killer whales and other toothed whales. The researchers collected nine species of cephalopods up to a...


Latest Narwhal Reference Libraries

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2007-06-24 18:33:22

The Polar cod or Arctic cod, Boreogadus saida, is a fish of the family Gadidae, related to the true cod (genus Gadus). Note that there is another fish with the common name Arctic cod, Arctogadus glacialis. The Polar cod has a slender body, deeply forked tail, projecting mouth and a small whisker on its chin. It is plainly colored with brownish spots and a silvery body. It grows to a length of 11.81 in (30 cm). The Polar cod is found further north than any other fish species (beyond 84...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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