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Latest NASA X-43 Stories

X-43A hypersonic research aircraft
2014-03-27 04:53:03

Source Material Provided by NASA NASA's X-43A shattered existing speed records for aircraft with air-breathing engines on March 27, 2004, when the scram-jet powered plane reached Mach 6.83 - 4,900 miles per hour - during a brief flight over the Pacific Ocean. This new speed record was more than twice as fast as the SR-71 Blackbird, which could cruise at Mach 3.32—2,193 mph. The X-43A's speed even bested the rocket-powered X-15A-2, which had set a record of Mach 6.7 - 4,520 mph - in...

New Conceptual Configuration For Air-breathing Hypersonic Airplanes
2013-12-17 15:00:13

Science China Press How to design a hypersonic airplane that travels from Beijing to New York in only two hours? Dr. Cui Kai and his group from State Key Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences set out to tackle this problem. After three years of innovative research, they presented a body-wing-blending configuration with double flanking air inlets layout to aim at design requirements of high lift-to-drag ratio as well as high...

X-51A Waverider
2012-08-13 16:14:30

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The next generation of flight is undergoing a test tomorrow over the Pacific Ocean, paving the way for non-stop Paris trips in just a few hours in the future. The X-51A WaveRider is being prepared at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert. This aircraft could take you from New York to London in less than an hour. The experimental aircraft uses a "scramjet" engine that allows it to travel at hypersonic speeds, reaching Mach 4.5...

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2009-04-30 08:15:00

When a jet is flying faster than the speed of sound, one small mistake can tear it apart. And when the jet is so experimental that it must fly unmanned, only a computer control system can pilot it. Ohio State University engineers have designed control system software that can do just that -- by adapting to changing conditions during a flight. Government agencies have been developing faster-than-sound vehicles for decades. The latest supersonic combustion ramjets -- called scramjets -- burn...

2009-03-10 14:06:23

Kevin Petersen, director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center in California, says he will retire next month. A veteran aerospace engineer and manager with 38 years experience at Dryden, Petersen has served as the center's director for more than 10 years and is the longest-serving field center director currently at NASA, officials said. Dryden's deputy center director, David McBride, has been named acting director. NASA officials said that during...

2006-01-11 07:36:34

BANGALORE, India -- India has joined a handful of countries with the technology to build a new type of supersonic rocket that could reduce satellite launching costs by nearly 90 percent, the nation's space agency said Tuesday. The so-called Supersonic Combustion Ramjet - or Scramjet - technology should eventually help India build lighter and faster rockets, the Indian Space Research Organization said. Conventional rockets carry their own oxygen to burn as fuel, but Scramjet rockets will...

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2005-06-20 12:01:16

NASA -- NASA has been officially recognized for setting the speed record for a jet-powered aircraft by Guinness World Records. NASA set the record in November during the third and final flight of the experimental X-43A scramjet (supersonic-combustion ramjet) project. The X-43A demonstrated an advanced form of air-breathing jet engine could power an aircraft nearly 10 times the speed of sound. Data from the unpiloted, 12-foot-long research vehicle show its revolutionary engine worked...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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