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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 7:52 EDT

Latest Nasal irrigation Stories

2008-07-14 00:00:26

By Thomas Lee, Star Tribune, Minneapolis Jul. 14--Doctors use balloon catheters to open clogged arteries. Now, one local start-up hopes to apply the same technology to people who have clogged sinuses. Entellus Medical Inc., based in Maple Grove, has developed what it bills as a cheaper and less invasive away to treat sinusitis, or severe chronic sinus infections. The procedure involves inserting a balloon catheter into the nasal cavity through a tiny incision under the lip, expanding...

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2008-07-13 18:00:00

Doctors use balloon catheters to open clogged arteries. Now, one local start-up hopes to apply the same technology to people who have clogged sinuses. Entellus Medical Inc., based in Maple Grove, has developed what it bills as a cheaper and less invasive away to treat sinusitis, or severe chronic sinus infections. The procedure involves inserting a balloon catheter into the nasal cavity through a tiny incision under the lip, expanding the balloon in the passageway and draining excess mucus...

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2008-02-22 09:00:00

DALLAS -- Like an estimated 36 million Americans, Karen Lukin of Dallas suffers from sinus problems each spring. She tried a sinus rinse at the recommendation of a prominent ear, nose and throat doctor, but it made her gag and seemed expensive. Then she embraced a holistic, low-tech alternative derived from ancient Ayurvedic medicine, practiced for centuries in India: the neti pot. Lukin's introduction to this small appliance came by way of a thoroughly modern forum: "The Oprah...

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2008-01-21 16:00:00

New research shows simple salt water may be the best cure for a child's cold symptoms.  In a recent European study, rinsing with a nasal spray made from Atlantic Ocean seawater improved cold and cough symptoms faster and prevented recurrence in children 6-10 years old. The study, funded by Goemar Laboratories La Madeleine, Saint-Malo, France, which makes Physiomer, the seawater nasal spray used in the analysis, was published in this month's issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology....

2006-07-25 11:15:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Nasal irrigation, a traditional therapy that has been shown to help people with chronic sinus problems, can be easily learned with a 30-minute group training session, a new study shows. Patients in the study also reported a sense of "empowerment" because they could use and adjust the technique effectively on their own rather than requiring multiple doctor visits and prescriptions, Dr. David Rabago of the University of Wisconsin at Madison and colleagues report....