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Latest Natalia Rybczynski Stories

reconstruction of the early Eocene
2014-07-09 09:33:31

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Silvacola acares is a tiny hedgehog species that lived roughly 52-million-years ago, during the Eocene Epoch. Its fossil remains were recently identified by a University of Colorado Boulder-led team working in British Columbia. Along with the tiny hedgehog, the fossils of a tapir-like animal were also discovered. A paper on the discovery of these two ancient mammals is being published today in the Journal of Vertebrate...

Fossils of Gaint Camel Ancestor Discovered In Northern Canada
2013-03-05 15:59:17

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have discovered the fossilized remains of a giant prehistoric species of camel in the far northern regions of Canada, suggesting that the modern versions of these hoofed creatures are descended from ancestors which lived within the Arctic Circle. A team led by paleontologist Dr. Natalia Rybczynski of the Canadian Museum of Nature found 30 fossil fragments of a leg bone on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, during the summers...

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2010-06-30 07:14:49

A new study shows the Arctic climate system may be more sensitive to greenhouse warming than previously thought, and that current levels of Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide may be high enough to bring about significant, irreversible shifts in Arctic ecosystems. Led by the University of Colorado at Boulder, the international study indicated that while the mean annual temperature on Ellesmere Island in the High Arctic during the Pliocene Epoch 2.6 to 5.3 million years ago was about 34 degrees...

2009-04-23 23:26:59

A 24-million-year-old fossil thought to be a missing link in evolution has been discovered in northern Canada, researchers said. Carnegie Museum of Natural History paleontologist Mary Dawson was a member of an international team that found the fossil, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review said Thursday. The find -- reported in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature -- may be the missing link between land carnivores and seals, sea lions and walruses, the newspaper said. San Diego State University...

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2009-04-22 16:00:00

Scientists from Canada and the U.S. have discovered the skeleton of a previously unknown web-footed carnivore in Canada's Arctic. The researchers said their discovery sheds light on how seals developed from land-based mammals. The primitive animal, known as Puijila darwini, measured around 43 inches from nose to tail, and had a body similar to that of an otter, but a skull akin to a seal. New research suggests Puijila is a "missing link" in the evolution of the group that today includes...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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