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Latest National Academy of Sciences Stories

2014-05-19 23:02:20

A University of Maryland study of a rare genetic disorder that causes premature aging and early death may help explain the effects of normal aging on the cardiovascular system. The study was published online today, May 19, 2014 in Early Edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (PRWEB) May 19, 2014 Children with progeria, a rare disorder that causes premature aging, die in their teens of ailments that are common in octogenarians: heart failure and stroke. Kan Cao, a...

2014-05-07 08:54:14

Each time a human cell divides, it must first make a copy of its 46 chromosomes to serve as an instruction manual for the new cell. Normally, this process goes off without a hitch. But from time to time, the information isn't copied and collated properly, leaving gaps or breaks that the cell has to carefully combine back together. Researchers have long recognized that some regions of the chromosome,called "fragile sites," are more prone to breakage and can be a breeding ground for human...

2014-05-07 08:45:28

A new study led by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine has painted a clearer picture of the delicate arms race between the human immune system and a pathogen that seeks to infect and kill human cells. The research explores the strategies by which the bacterial pathogen Yersinia, responsible for causing plague and gastrointestinal infections, tries to outsmart immune cell responses and looks at the tactics used by the immune system to fight back....

2014-05-06 15:07:45

Populations of predators and their prey usually follow predictable cycles. When the number of prey increases, perhaps as their food supply becomes more abundant, predator populations also grow. When the predator population becomes too large, however, the prey population often plummets, leaving too little food for the predators, whose population also then crashes. This canonical view of predator-prey relationships was first identified by mathematical biologists Alfred Lotka and Vito...

2014-05-02 10:06:07

Enzyme's double-edged sword may soon be sheathed Johns Hopkins biochemists have figured out what is needed to activate and sustain the virus-fighting activity of an enzyme found in CD4+ T cells, the human immune cells infected by HIV. The discovery could launch a more effective strategy for preventing the spread of HIV in the body with drugs targeting this enzyme, they say. A summary of their work was published online on April 21 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of...

2014-05-01 23:01:47

Brenda Schulman, Ph.D., joins an illustrious group of scientists recognized by the academy. Memphis, Tenn. (PRWEB) May 01, 2014 Brenda Schulman, Ph.D., of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Membership in the academy is a widely accepted mark of excellence in science and is considered one of the highest honors a scientist can receive. Schulman, a structural biologist, is among 84 new members and 21 foreign associates from 15...

2014-05-01 16:31:19

Brenda Schulman, Ph.D., joins an illustrious group of scientists recognized by the academy MEMPHIS, Tenn., May 1, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Brenda Schulman, Ph.D., of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Membership in the academy is a widely accepted mark of excellence in science and is considered one of the highest honors a scientist can receive. Schulman, a structural biologist, is among 84 new members and 21...

2014-04-29 12:34:38

DALLAS, April 29, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) today announced the election of Dr. Zhijian "James" Chen, professor of molecular biology, who holds the George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science and is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at UT Southwestern Medical Center. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140429/81899 Being elected to the NAS is one of the highest honors in American science, and with Dr....

2014-04-10 16:15:29

New findings hold promise for expanded use of bioluminescence imaging tools New research from scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School shows that fruit flies are secretly harboring the biochemistry needed to glow in the dark —otherwise known as bioluminescence. The key to activating this latent ability is a novel synthetic analog of D-luciferin developed at UMMS. The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that...

2014-04-10 12:19:18

By attaching short sequences of single-stranded DNA to nanoscale building blocks, researchers can design structures that can effectively build themselves. The building blocks that are meant to connect have complementary DNA sequences on their surfaces, ensuring only the correct pieces bind together as they jostle into one another while suspended in a test tube. Now, a University of Pennsylvania team has made a discovery with implications for all such self-assembled structures. Earlier...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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