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Latest National Academy of Sciences Stories

2014-03-04 13:42:21

People's racial prejudices are influenced by where they live, reports a new study led by Oxford University psychologists. The researchers found that levels of racial prejudice among white people drop significantly when they live in ethnically mixed communities, even when they do not have direct contact with minorities. Simply seeing white strangers interacting positively with ethnic minorities is enough to reduce racial prejudice. The researchers have called this positive effect...

2014-02-27 18:33:27

By re-engineering a tiny chain of amino acids in one type of dengue virus, Ralph Baric and Aravinda de Silva discover a new path toward solving the dengue vaccine dilemma. The research has the potential to transform vaccine development for other diseases, including SARS and HIV. Creating a vaccine that protects people from all four types of dengue virus has frustrated scientists for decades. But researchers at the University of North Carolina have discovered a new target for human...

2014-02-18 13:46:43

Teenage boys who show a combination of depressive symptoms and elevated levels of the 'stress hormone' cortisol are up to fourteen times more likely to develop major depression than those who show neither trait, according to research funded by the Wellcome Trust. In a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the University of Cambridge have identified the first biomarker – a biological signpost – for major, or clinical, depression....

2014-02-18 13:43:42

High levels of the stress hormone cortisol may contribute to the risk aversion and 'irrational pessimism' found among bankers and fund managers during financial crises, according to a new study. The study's authors say that risk takers in the financial world exhibit risk averse behavior during periods of extreme market volatility – just when a crashing market most needs them to take risks – and that this change in their appetite for risk may be "physiologically-driven", specifically by...

2014-02-07 13:15:15

A team of researchers led by Virginia Tech and University of California, Berkeley, scientists has discovered that a regulatory process that turns on photosynthesis in plants at daybreak likely developed on Earth in ancient microbes 2.5 billion years ago, long before oxygen became available. The research opens new scientific areas in the fields of evolutionary biology and microbiology. The work also has broad societal implications as it allows scientists to better understand the production...

2014-01-28 12:20:14

Drugs used to treat HIV penetrate poorly into lymphatic tissues where most HIV replication takes place and there is persistent low-level virus replication in these tissues according to research from the University of Minnesota and University of Nebraska Medical Center. The results appear in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). "We know the drugs we use today are effective because our patients are doing better and living longer, but these drugs...

2014-01-21 10:24:45

For first time, PARP-1 enzyme, Sidekick-1 gene implicated in enhancing brain reward system Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a new molecular mechanism by which cocaine alters the brain's reward circuits and causes addiction. Published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Dr. Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD, and colleagues, the preclinical research reveals how an abundant enzyme and synaptic gene affect a key reward...

2014-01-21 10:23:07

Study finds blowback causes extra day per year of ozone smog in LA Chinese air pollution blowing across the Pacific Ocean is often caused by the manufacturing of goods for export to the U.S. and Europe, according to findings by UC Irvine and other researchers published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study is the first to quantify how much pollution reaching the American West Coast is from the production in China of cellphones, televisions and other...

2013-12-30 23:00:54

Cold-sensitive mangrove forests have expanded dramatically along Florida’s Atlantic Coast as the frequency of killing frosts has declined, according to a new study based on 28 years of satellite data from the University of Maryland and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland. College Park, Md (PRWEB) December 30, 2013 Cold-sensitive mangrove forests have expanded dramatically along Florida’s Atlantic Coast as the frequency of killing frosts has declined,...

2013-12-17 11:04:05

Targeting the stem rather than the head of a critical protein is the challenging but promising tactic of a new study Every year the approach of flu season sets off a medical guessing game with life or death consequences. There are many different strains of flu and they vary from year to year. So each season authorities must make an educated guess and tell manufacturers which variants of the flu they should produce vaccines against. Even when this system works, flu-related illnesses can...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.