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Latest National Academy of Sciences Stories

2013-06-11 13:25:51

Although scientists have known since the middle of the 19th century that the tropics are teeming with species while the poles harbor relatively few, the origin of the most dramatic and pervasive biodiversity on Earth has never been clear. New research sheds light on how that pattern came about. Furthermore, it confirms that the tropics have been and continue to be the Earth's engine of biodiversity. By examining marine bivalves (two-shelled mollusks including scallops, cockles and...

2013-06-11 11:16:32

New findings provide vital step towards exploring pain medications that may lower risks of prescription drug abuse and side effects of painkillers For patients managing cancer and other chronic health issues, painkillers such as morphine and Vicodin are often essential for pain relief. The body's natural tendency to develop tolerance to these medications, however, often requires patients to take higher doses — increasing risks of harmful side effects and dependency. Now, new...

2013-06-11 11:12:09

Females play a larger role in determining paternity than previously thought, say biologists in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences. Their findings are the subject of a new paper titled "Female mediation of competitive fertilization success in Drosophila melanogaster," published this month by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Stefan Lüpold, a research assistant professor in the college's Department of Biology and...

2013-06-06 23:04:14

National Academy of Sciences recommends on-range management of wild horses. New York, NY (PRWEB) June 06, 2013 The ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) has announced its support of the National Academy of Sciences´ (NAS) study that was released today, which identifies ways the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) can modify its program to manage sustainable populations of wild horses on public lands. The study takes note of several key findings,...

Four New Studies Show Early Humans Had A Diet Rich In Grass
2013-06-04 11:43:40

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Four new studies have taken a new look at the diets of our ancestors and have found their behavior was a “game changer” for early humans some 3.5 million years ago. An ape-like diet that included grasses and sedges paved the way for a diet rich in grains, meats and dairy from grazing animals. In the first of the four studies, researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder conducted high-tech tests on tooth enamel...

2013-05-28 11:28:39

Dartmouth study identifies new regulator for plant hormone signaling Dartmouth College researchers have identified a new regulator for plant hormone signaling -- the KISS ME DEADLY family of proteins (KMDs) — that may help to improve production of fruits, vegetables and grains. The study's results will be published the week of May 27 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Journalists can access the paper, titled "SCFKMD controls cytokinin signaling by...

2013-05-28 10:24:21

An epilepsy drug shows promise in an animal model at preventing tinnitus from developing after exposure to loud noise, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, reported this week in the early online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveal for the first time the reason the chronic and sometimes debilitating condition occurs. An estimated 5 to 15 percent of Americans hear whistling, clicking,...

2013-05-28 10:22:21

A sugar polymer found on the cell surface of multiple pathogens could be key to developing a broad-spectrum vaccine Developing new vaccines to protect against diseases that plague humans is fraught with numerous challenges–one being that microbes tend to vary how they look on the surface to avoid being identified and destroyed by the immune system. However, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have discovered a sugar polymer that is common on the cell surface of...

2013-05-22 10:17:41

Rice computational study tracks E. coli cells´ regulatory mechanisms Environment is not the only factor in shaping regulatory patterns – and it might not even be the primary factor, according to a new Rice University study that looks at how cells´ protein networks relate to a bacteria´s genome. The Rice lab of computer scientist Luay Nakhleh reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that when environmental factors are eliminated from an...

Method For Tailoring Optical Processors Unveiled
2013-05-21 14:34:15

Rice University Rice University scientists have unveiled a robust new method for arranging metal nanoparticles in geometric patterns that can act as optical processors that transform incoming light signals into output of a different color. The breakthrough by a team of theoretical and applied physicists and engineers at Rice's Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP) is described this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Rice's team used the method to create an...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.