Quantcast

Latest National Centre for Atmospheric Science Stories

2009-08-19 09:30:00

Targeted investments in climate science could lead to major benefits in reducing the costs of adapting to a changing climate, according to new research published by scientists from the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS). Published in the scientific journal, the Bulletin for the American Meteorological Society, the study shows that investments made now, can lead to as much as 10-20% improvement in climate predictions for the UK and Europe in the coming decades, and up to 20%...

d252942075a806ec5cf1e11833f542051
2009-01-21 11:00:00

Cosmic-rays detected half a mile underground in a disused U.S. iron-mine can be used to detect major weather events occurring 20 miles up in the Earth's upper atmosphere, a new study has revealed. Published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters and led by scientists from the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), this remarkable study shows how the number of high-energy cosmic-rays reaching a detector deep...

d964ef1c22d080a0c83de33f67c483281
2008-10-23 15:15:00

Scientists are hoping to discover new information on how clouds over the Pacific Ocean can affect the global climate and weather systems. The clouds, some greater than the size of the US, refract sunlight back into space and chill the ocean below. The researchers expect to learn about the clouds' properties and if pollution from activities could alter the arrangement of these cloud systems. The study will engage 200 scientists from 10 countries in the research. An additional team of 20...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.