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Latest National DNA database Stories

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2012-08-26 08:08:46

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The next time you leave your DNA behind be forewarned that you are now not only leaving your biological fingerprint behind for prying eyes, but also leaving evidence of what color your hair and eyes are. Until the mid-1980s, DNA at a crime scene went largely unchecked due to lack of technology to search it out. And for the last two decades, in order for a crime scene detective to match DNA to a suspect, samples had to be taken from...

Forensic Scientists Criticize FBI's New CODIS Plan
2011-10-18 04:53:22

Five members of the forensic science community criticized the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) DNA database system, according to a BBC report by writer Paul Rincon. The FBI's CODIS system generates the genetic profiles stored in the U.S. national DNA database. The agency plans to expand the number of genetic markers used by CODIS to try and classify individual DNA profiles. However, a few forensic scientists have negative opinions about the FBI's new plan. Dr Bruce Budowle...

2010-08-24 12:06:00

Names confirmed thanks to technology advances FORT WORTH, Texas, Aug. 24 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Center for Human Identification at the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) analyzes DNA from unidentified human remains for law enforcement organizations and medical examiners across the country in an attempt to put a name to a body or victim. The result, in many cases, is resolution for family members who have spent years wondering about the fate of their loved...

2009-09-10 11:14:06

British geneticist Alec Jeffreys, a pioneer in the use of DNA in criminal investigation, says his country's DNA database should be reduced dramatically. Twenty-five years after his research helped revolutionize DNA fingerprinting and profiling, Jeffreys has questioned the current size of Britain's DNA database and its infringement on residents' privacy, The Times of London reported Thursday. We now have a database that is populated with in the order of 800,000 entirely innocent people, which...

2009-08-17 07:00:00

TEL AVIV, Israel, Aug. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Nucleix, Ltd., an emerging life science company specializing in forensic DNA analysis, announced that company researchers have proven DNA evidence found at crime scenes can easily be falsified using basic equipment, know-how and access to DNA or a DNA database. Recognizing the need to safeguard the accuracy and credibility of DNA samples in the field of forensics, Nucleix scientists have developed a novel assay termed "DNA authentication" for...

2009-08-04 15:27:00

FORT WORTH, Texas, Aug. 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Of the 600,000-800,000 people trafficked across international borders each year, 50 percent are under 17. It is estimated that by 2010, human trafficking will be the No. 1 crime worldwide. Arthur Eisenberg, Ph.D., professor and chairman of the department of forensic and investigative Genetics and co-director of the UNT Center for Human Identification at the University of North Texas (UNT) Health Science Center, is on a mission to stop...

2009-07-06 15:06:03

As the popularity of take-home DNA kits to trace ancestry or calculate the risk for serious medical conditions grows, there is an increasingly critical need for federal oversight of "direct-to consumer" genetic testing, as well as of the use of DNA samples for research, according to researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and several other academic institutions.In the past year, scientists, sociologists and bioethicists, among others, have come to agree that the technology of...

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2009-04-20 05:55:00

According to a New York Times report, US federal and state law enforcement agencies are expanding their DNA collection to include those who are arrested or detained, not only those who are convicted. The move is raising concerns over the privacy of minor offenders. Previously, law enforcement agencies only collected samples from those who were convicted. Starting this month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, along with 15 states, will begin collecting DNA samples of those awaiting trial,...

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2008-12-04 14:50:00

Europe's human rights court ruled on Thursday against practices in Britain that retained DNA information for two individuals whose cases had been dismissed. One of the individuals was an 11-year-old boy who had been accused of attempted robbery, and was later acquitted. The other individual was a man who was charged with harassing his partner; his case was formally discontinued.However, even as police were asked to destroy their DNA samples, they kept the information on the basis of a law...

2007-08-11 18:15:00

By Mark Cowan CRIME CORRESPONDENT SCIENTIFIC sleuths in Birmingham have been thrust into the spotlight bcause their expertise could hold the key to solving two shocking crimes. DNA detectives at the Forensic Science Service labs in the city have been asked to analyse blood samples found in the hotel room where missing Madeleine McCann was last seen alive. The city's very own Crime Scene Investigators were also on hand to help police in the search for the body of missing Birmingham man...


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tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.