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Latest National Electric Drag Racing Association Stories

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2009-09-07 07:40:00

Spectators at the Mason-Dixon Dragway got a rare glimpse of the future as they watched electric cars rev up and silently charge around the Maryland track at speeds of more than 100 miles an hour. The cars, motorcycles and tricycles were an eye-opener for the baffled visitors, who were more accustomed to seeing the dust, dirt and smells of traditional gas-fueled dragsters. "Seeing them run for the first time today definitely scared me because their times are kinda close to some of my times,"...

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2007-07-30 11:00:00

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Straddling a 619-pound motorcycle, Scotty Pollacheck tucks in his knees and lowers his head as he waits for the green light. When he revs the engine, there's no roar. The bike moves so fast that within seconds all that's visible is a faint red taillight melting in the distance. Pollacheck crosses the quarter-mile marker doing 156 mph; he's traveled 1,320 feet in 8.22 seconds, faster than any of the gas-powered cars, trucks or motorcycles that have raced in the drag sprints...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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