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Latest National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Stories

2008-10-27 06:00:23

NATICK, Mass., Oct. 27 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Boston Scientific Corporation today welcomed an announcement by the U.K.'s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommending the use of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for patients with chronic neuropathic pain. In its comprehensive final guidance, NICE confirmed that SCS is both safe and clinically effective in these patients. Importantly, NICE also concluded that SCS is cost-effective when used to treat patients with...

2008-10-02 09:00:07

By JEREMY LAURANCE THE rising tide of protest over the refusal by the NHS to provide expensive drugs for cancer and other conditions is being funded by the pharmaceutical industry, it has been revealed. Patient groups that have been among the most vocal in spearheading attacks on the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (Nice) over decisions to restrict access to drugs on the NHS depend for up to half of their income on drug firms, but details are often undisclosed. The growing...

2008-10-01 09:00:09

By Jeremy Laurance Charities' protests against Nice funded by pharmaceutical companies Special investigation The rising tide of protest over the refusal by the NHS to provide expensive drugs for cancer and other conditions is being funded by the pharmaceutical industry, an investigation by The Independent has revealed. Patient groups that have been among the most vocal in spearheading attacks on the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (Nice) over decisions to restrict access to...

2008-09-30 00:00:12

By Jeremy Laurance Medical Life Medicines are like money - they provoke strong emotions and no one is capable of being entirely rational about them. Do you know anyone who isn't either a spendthrift or a scrooge? No, neither do I. It's the same with drugs (the medical kind). We can't get enough of them (postcode lotteries) or we can't get away from them (a pill for every ill). They are too expensive or too toxic, or we are taking too many or they are too hard to obtain. An attack of...

2008-09-25 12:00:15

By Martin Eatock A new drug called Lapatinib was recently hailed a "big step forward" for women suffering from advanced breast cancer. Consultant medical oncologist at the Belfast City Hospital, Dr Martin Eatock, argues that its true impact could be limited Lapatinib, used in combination with the chemotherapy drug capecitabine, was recently licensed for the treatment of Her-2 positive advanced breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease which affects around a quarter of those women...

2008-09-24 18:00:00

By Emma Brady Considering the current state of Britain's housing market, anyone hoping to make a sale must be desperate to move. Stephen Allen was so desperate that in a short space of time he moved from both Worcestershire and the Black Country because his local primary care trusts would not fund kidney cancer drug Sutent (sunitinib) - which cost more than pounds 3,000 a course. The trust stated it was too expensive to justify the extra months of life he might get. But when he...

2008-09-24 18:00:14

A SENIOR civil servant, diagnosed with terminal cancer and denied treatment with a new drug, has taken his campaign to the National Assembly calling for an end to the postcode lottery. Former Brecon town mayor Chris Lewis, who has been given two years to live, said he is now fighting for thousands of others who are terminally ill and would even refuse the drug treatment unless it was prescribed to all patients in his situation. The grandfather-of-four is calling on Welsh Health Minister...

2008-09-24 12:00:36

By JULIA HORTON RITALIN, the controversial drug for calming hyper active children, should no longer be the first treatment offered to most youngsters, according to advice out today from an influential health watchdog. The guidelines, from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice), recommend that the drug should only be used as the "first-line treatment" for youngsters aged six and over with severe cases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Instead,...

2008-09-23 09:01:09

By Barry Nelson CANCER campaigner Barbara Selby has died without ever getting the advanced drug she believed could prolong her life. The plight of Mrs Selby, who spent more than a year trying to persuade her local NHS primary care trust to fund her treatment with a drug called Sutent, was first highlighted by The Northern Echo. The grandmother and mother-of-three died peacefully at her home in Richmond early last Friday. Mrs Selby, a former NHS nurse from Richmond, who turned 65 last...

2008-09-19 00:00:29

Why aren't drugs which could save or prolong the lives of cancer sufferers not being licensed for NHS use? That was the tough question being faced yesterday by NICE, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, at a special meeting in Plymouth, writes Sophie Roberts. Local people had the chance to hear about latest developments and quiz health bosses during an hour-long public question time. The audience included people with terminal illnesses and their partners, as well...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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