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Latest National Institute for Materials Science Stories

2014-03-12 00:20:37

Tsukuba, Japan, Mar 12, 2014 - (ACN Newswire) - In 1990, scientists reported that nanostructured silicon can emit visible light. This report opened a new frontier for photoelectronics in information technology, called "silicon photonics". Furthermore, the continuous tuning of electromagnetic emission from near-UV to near-infrared wavelengths has been achieved by controlling silicon nanostructures. The quantum yield (QY) of this radiation may exceed 70%, and the use of silicon as the emitting...

2014-01-28 04:20:03

Source: NIMSTsukuba, Japan, Jan 28, 2014 - (ACN Newswire) - Japan's National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) have signed a 5-year collaborative agreement to co-publish the open access journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM). Their goal is to make STAM one of the world's leading publications in materials science. Founded in 2000, Science and Technology of Advanced Materials provides an...

2013-10-03 04:20:03

Tsukuba, Japan, Oct 3, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - More than a century after the identification of organisms that cause tuberculosis (TB), this disease remains a global public health challenge. According to World Health Organization estimates, there were 8.7 million new cases in 2011 and 1.4 million deaths. Most new cases occur in developing countries that lack the facilities and trained personnel required for early detection of TB.In a new study, published in the journal Science and Technology...

2013-02-07 12:20:01

Tsukuba, Japan, Feb 7, 2013 - (ACN Newswire) - Radioactive leaks, such as at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, contaminate the local environment. Contamination of soil and water by the radioactive form of caesium is a major problem, since it persists for a long time; levels of radioactivity reduce by half only every 30 years. Effective detection and removal of radiocaesium would accelerate recovery of the environment.Current detection methods can only localise contamination on a...

2012-11-01 17:20:02

Tsukuba, Japan, Nov 1, 2012 - (ACN Newswire) - Better control over the delivery of drugs to specific sites in the body at specific times would reduce unwanted side effects and improve medical treatment dramatically. 'Smart' polymers are promising materials for controlling drug delivery, since they change their properties in response to specific stimuli. However, they usually require continuous stimulation to maintain these changes. Now, researchers led by Takao Aoyagi at the MANA, National...

2012-04-04 08:20:01

Tsukuba, Japan, Apr 4, 2012 - (ACN Newswire) - Although steel production dates back about 4000 years, exploration of steel potential abilities is still advancing. With an output of about 45%, China dominates when it comes to basic steel production. Japan however is shifting towards so called 'high-grade steels'. Take for example, the water-cooled thermomechanical control process (TMCP) steels. Relative to traditional water-cooled steel plate processes, TMCP steels offer simultaneous...

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2011-05-13 09:51:41

A surprising breakthrough moment in superconducting physics has come from, of all places, a boozy office party at the National Institute for Materials Science in Tsukuba Japan, according to a recent AFP report. Researchers, lead by Yoshihiko Takano, made their discovery when they put tablets of an iron-based compound called Fe(Te,S) into alcoholic drinks at an office party a year ago. The phenomenon of superconductivity is the zero-loss flow of electricity through certain materials. When an...

2011-03-07 14:14:20

Japanese researchers have been immersing iron-based compounds in hot alcoholic beverages such as red wine, sake and shochu to induce superconductivity. Scientists from the National Institute for Materials Science, Japan, found that immersing pellets of an iron-based compound in heated alcoholic beverages for 24 hours greatly increase their superconducting ability. Iron-based compounds usually become superconductive after being exposed to air. This process however can take up to several...

2011-01-12 00:01:32

In a timely review paper, scientists from Japan, Germany, and Spain provide a highly relevant overview of the history, physical interpretation and applications of plasmons in metallic nanostructures. (PRWeb UK) January 11, 2011 Tadaaki Nagao at the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and colleagues in Germany and Spain present a review on plasmons in metallic nanomaterials. The article is published this week in the...

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2010-07-08 14:33:06

Metallic carbon nanotubes show great promise for applications from microelectronics to power lines because of their ballistic transmission of electrons. But who knew magnets could stop those electrons in their tracks? Rice physicist Junichiro Kono and his team have been studying the Aharonov-Bohm effect -- the interaction between electrically charged particles and magnetic fields -- and how it relates to carbon nanotubes.  While doing so, they came to the unexpected conclusion that...


Latest National Institute for Materials Science Reference Libraries

Science and Technology of Advanced Materials
2012-05-02 19:20:20

Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published bimonthly by the Institute of Physics, which also prints the journal. Prior to 2008, this journal was published by Elsevier. Printed volumes of this journal are, as of 2008, published free of charge by the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and the Institute of Physics. The journal was established in 2000. The journal covers all aspects of materials science, including theoretical...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.