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Latest National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Stories

2008-10-21 09:00:54

BASKING RIDGE, N.J., Oct. 21 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Hooper Holmes today announced that its Heritage Labs division was awarded a contract to manufacture biospecimen kits for the National Children's Study (NCS) by Westat, an employee-owned corporation providing research services to agencies of the U.S. Government as well as businesses, foundations, and state and local governments. This component of the NCS was awarded to Westat by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

2008-10-06 18:00:35

OAKLAND, Calif., Oct. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Infants who slept in a bedroom with a fan ventilating the air had a 72 percent lower risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome compared to infants who slept in a bedroom without a fan, according to a new study by the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research. The study appears in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine. This is the first study to examine an association between better air ventilation in infants' bedrooms and...

2008-10-06 12:00:42

BETHESDA, Md., Oct. 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- From asthma and cancer treatments to vaccines, research in children saves lives and improves their health and well-being. A new Web site from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), "Children and Clinical Studies" (http://www.childrenandclinicalstudies.nhlbi.nih.gov/), offers parents and health care providers an insider's guide to children's medical research. The Web site combines information about how clinical studies in youth are conducted...

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2008-10-03 15:30:00

Officials from the U.S. National Institutes of Health announced on Friday that their study to determine the health of 100,000 U.S. children from before birth to age 21 is slated to begin in January 2009. The National Children's Study will cost $3.2 billion and is intended to find factors leading to autism, cerebral palsy learning disabilities, birth defects, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, diabetes, asthma, heart disease, obesity and other conditions. The comprehensive study will...

2008-09-13 03:00:25

By Wang, Chuang Algozzine, Bob Abstract. Reading problems are among the most prevalent concerns in schools; poor readers in elementary school who do not receive special assistance are particularly at risk for dismal academic careers. In a large-scale project, children with serious reading problems received targeted intervention to address critical early literacy skills. The assistance combined focused practice and frequent monitoring to provide instruction needed to improve reading skills....

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2008-09-11 13:34:29

Scientists looking for treatments to control the AIDS virus may find hope in a cheap drug traditionally used to treat herpes. Dr. Leonid Margolis of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, helped lead the study published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Researchers found that acyclovir can work against HIV, but only in tissues that are also infected with herpes. "If you suppress herpes, HIV also goes down," Margolis said. Other studies have shown that people who...

2008-07-17 09:01:07

LearningAbled, a company that is pioneering a multi-service team approach to assisting children with language-related learning disabilities, today announced the addition of nationally known education specialist Dr. G. Reid Lyon to its board of directors. Dr. Lyon is an outspoken advocate for scientifically based education policy who served as Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch of the National Institute of Health's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development...

2008-07-10 06:00:40

Scientists have new evidence that the brain chemical best known for regulating mood also plays a role in the mystifying killer of seemingly healthy babies - sudden infant death syndrome. Autopsied brain tissue from SIDS babies first raised suspicion that an imbalance in serotonin might be behind what once was called crib death. But specialists couldn't figure out how that defect could kill. Now researchers in Italy have engineered mice born with serotonin that goes haywire - and found the...

2008-07-04 09:00:03

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists have new evidence that the brain chemical best known for regulating mood also plays a role in the mystifying killer of seemingly healthy babies -- sudden infant death syndrome. Autopsied tissue from SIDS babies first raised suspicion that an imbalance in serotonin might be a factor. But specialists couldn't figure out how that defect could kill. Now researchers in Italy have engineered mice born with serotonin that goes haywire -- and found the brain...

2008-05-30 11:53:09

Researchers in Britain report they have identified two common bacteria that may contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), one of the leading causes of death in children under the age of one.   The scientists performed post-mortem tests on more than 470 babies who died suddenly and without explanation in a London hospital over a ten year time period. They discovered potentially lethal bacteria such as E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus in nearly half of all...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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