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Latest National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Stories

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2010-02-18 09:40:00

The rate of stillbirths in rural areas of six developing countries fell more than 30 percent following a basic training program in newborn care for birth attendants, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The study tracked more than 120,000 births. The study tested the efficacy of a three-day Essential Newborn Care training regimen that covers basic newborn care techniques, the importance of early breastfeeding, how to keep...

2010-02-15 08:22:44

Researchers caution not to be alarmed; more study needed to determine if delays are persistent and significant In a new study, infants averaging six months of age who exhibited positional plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome) had lower scores than typical infants in observational tests used to evaluate cognitive and motor development. Positional or deformational plagiocephaly may occur when external forces shape an infant's skull while it is still soft and malleable, such as extended time spent...

2010-02-04 15:15:19

Findings support view of preterm labor as immune response to infection or injury Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have identified DNA variants in mothers and fetuses that appear to increase the risk for preterm labor and delivery. The DNA variants were in genes involved in the regulation of inflammation and of the extracellular matrix, the mesh-like material that holds cells within tissues. "A substantial body of scientific evidence indicates that inflammatory hormones may...

2010-02-04 15:10:03

March of Dimes awards abstract at SMFM Meeting New evidence that genetics play a significant role in some premature births may help explain why a woman can do everything right and still give birth too soon. Research presented today at the 30th Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) meeting -- The Pregnancy Meetingâ“ž¢ -- showed that the genes of both the mother and the fetus can make them susceptible to an inflammatory response that increases the risk...

2010-02-04 15:08:09

New evidence that genetics play a significant role in some premature births may help explain why a woman can do everything right and still give birth too soon. Research presented today at the 30th Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) meeting "• The Pregnancy Meetingâ“ž¢ "• showed that the genes of both the mother and the fetus can make them susceptible to an inflammatory response that increases the risk of preterm labor and birth. Silent,...

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2010-02-03 08:50:00

NIH-funded study finds abnormalities in brain region that regulates breathing, sleep The brains of infants who die of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) produce low levels of serotonin, a brain chemical that conveys messages between cells and plays a vital role in regulating breathing, heart rate, and sleep, reported researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. SIDS is the death of an infant before his or her first birthday that cannot be explained after a complete autopsy, an...

2010-01-20 18:22:37

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have discovered the third in a sequence of genes that accounts for previously unexplained forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a genetic condition that weakens bones, results in frequent fractures and is sometimes fatal. The newly identified gene contains the information needed to make the protein Cyclophilin B. This protein is part of a complex of three proteins that modifies collagen, folding it into a precise...

2009-12-11 19:48:35

The advice of a pediatrician to place infants on their backs to sleep appears to be the single most important motivator in getting parents to follow these recommendations and a key reason that the rate of sudden death syndrome (SIDS) has plummeted since the "Back to Sleep" campaign was launched in 1994, says a UT Southwestern researcher. Multiple studies have shown that placing infants on their backs to sleep limits the risk of SIDS, the leading cause of death among children in the U.S. under...

2009-12-07 20:35:30

Placing infants on their backs for sleep can help reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). But a study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues shows that while the practice helped reduce the incidence of SIDS, it has reached a plateau since guidelines were released by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Published in the December issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, the study is based on data from the National...

2009-11-17 08:00:00

NEW YORK, November 17 /PRNewswire/ -- A new study that examines the value of maternal blood biomarkers will help identify and monitor patients at risk of developing preeclampsia and is set to change the way expectant mothers are cared for in prenatal clinics around the world. The study, conducted by scientists at the highly-respected National Institute of Child and Human Development of the National Institute of Health (NICHD/NIH), set out to determine the diagnostic indices and...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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