Quantcast

Latest National Institute of Health Stories

2013-08-23 10:38:07

NIH-funded study provides more evidence supporting development of noninvasive tests Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can distinguish those at low risk of developing kidney injury from those at high risk, a study suggests. The results also suggest that low levels of this protein, called CXCL9, can rule out rejection as a cause of kidney injury. The study appears online Aug. 22 in the American Journal of Transplantation. The work was funded by the National...

2013-08-19 15:09:48

By determining the three-dimensional structure of proteins at the atomic level, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered how some commonly used flame retardants, called brominated flame retardants (BFRs), can mimic estrogen hormones and possibly disrupt the body's endocrine system. BFRs are chemicals added or applied to materials to slow or prevent the start or growth of fire. "We're beginning to have a better understanding of flame retardants and their effect on...

2013-08-12 14:02:05

Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder share the most common genetic variation The largest genome-wide study of its kind has determined how much five major mental illnesses are traceable to the same common inherited genetic variations. Researchers funded in part by the National Institutes of Health found that the overlap was highest between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; moderate for bipolar disorder and depression and for ADHD and depression; and low between schizophrenia and autism....

2013-08-08 13:57:33

A team from the University of Washington has unveiled a comprehensive portrait of the genome of the world’s first immortal cell line, known as HeLa. The cell line was derived in 1951 from an aggressive cervical cancer that killed Henrietta Lacks, a 31-year-old African-American tobacco farmer and mother of five – the subject of the 2010 New York Times best-seller, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” They will also be...

2013-08-08 10:14:45

The National Institutes of Health today announced in Nature that it has reached an understanding with the family of the late Henrietta Lacks to allow biomedical researchers controlled access to the whole genome data of cells derived from her tumor, commonly known as HeLa cells. These cells have already been used extensively in scientific research and have helped make possible some of the most important medical advances of the past 60 years. These include the development of modern vaccines,...

2013-08-01 23:22:36

The CAI prioritized the NCI portfolio resulting in 50 near-term commercially viable inventions. The CAI will coordinate with small businesses, the biopharmaceutical industry and educational institutions to match these NCI technologies for possible collaboration and technology transfer. Bethesda, Maryland (PRWEB) August 01, 2013 The Center for Advancing Innovation, INC (CAI), a globally focused private-public partnership with an over-arching mission to drive successful innovation entered...

Study Suggests Silky Brain Implants May Help Stop Spread Of Epilepsy
2013-07-25 12:04:43

NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke NIH-funded study suggests role for adenosine in molecular processes involved in epilepsy Silk has walked straight off the runway and into the lab. According to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, silk implants placed in the brain of laboratory animals and designed to release a specific chemical, adenosine, may help stop the progression of epilepsy. The research was supported by the National Institute...


Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
Related