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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 13:20 EDT

Latest National Institute of Health Stories

2013-08-29 23:04:16

Led by WPI, a multi-institution team is developing a system that combines an MRI-guided robot with ablation by high-intensity ultrasound to accurately destroy tumors without damaging surrounding tissue. Worcester, Mass. (PRWEB) August 29, 2013 With a five-year, $3 million R01 award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), through the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a team of researchers led by Gregory Fischer, PhD, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and robotics...

2013-08-28 23:01:42

Five-year program will refine use of adult stem cells and novel biological sutures developed at WPI to heal damaged hearts. Worcester, MA (PRWEB) August 28, 2013 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a five-year, $1.94 million grant to a biomedical research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) working at the forefront of cell therapies for healing cardiac muscle damaged by heart attack or chronic disease. Funded through the NIH's premiere Research Project Grant...

2013-08-26 13:27:36

NIH-funded study could lead to new treatments for amblyopia A study in mice reveals an elegant circuit within the developing visual system that helps dictate how the eyes connect to the brain. The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, has implications for treating amblyopia, a vision disorder that occurs when the brain ignores one eye in favor of the other. Amblyopia is the most common cause of visual impairment in childhood, and can occur whenever there is a...

2013-08-23 10:38:07

NIH-funded study provides more evidence supporting development of noninvasive tests Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can distinguish those at low risk of developing kidney injury from those at high risk, a study suggests. The results also suggest that low levels of this protein, called CXCL9, can rule out rejection as a cause of kidney injury. The study appears online Aug. 22 in the American Journal of Transplantation. The work was funded by the National...

2013-08-19 15:09:48

By determining the three-dimensional structure of proteins at the atomic level, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered how some commonly used flame retardants, called brominated flame retardants (BFRs), can mimic estrogen hormones and possibly disrupt the body's endocrine system. BFRs are chemicals added or applied to materials to slow or prevent the start or growth of fire. "We're beginning to have a better understanding of flame retardants and their effect on...

2013-08-14 12:26:51

WASHINGTON, Aug. 14, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As federal funding cuts continue to jeopardize the progress of biomedical research, the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the world's largest professional organization dedicated to the causes and treatments of blood disorders, today announced the 12 recipients of its second round of ASH Bridge Grants. This innovative program, launched last year, supports the life-saving research of hematologists whose proposals were deemed...

2013-08-12 14:02:05

Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder share the most common genetic variation The largest genome-wide study of its kind has determined how much five major mental illnesses are traceable to the same common inherited genetic variations. Researchers funded in part by the National Institutes of Health found that the overlap was highest between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; moderate for bipolar disorder and depression and for ADHD and depression; and low between schizophrenia and autism....

2013-08-09 12:22:27

Letter to NIH Director Highlights Ongoing Value of Largest Study on Aging in Women WASHINGTON, Aug. 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- An influential group of women U.S. senators are urging the National Institutes of Health to continue current funding levels for the pioneering Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the largest study of middle-aged and older women in the nation. "The well-established WHI infrastructure provides a cost-effective, highly credible resource for continuing...

2013-08-08 13:57:33

A team from the University of Washington has unveiled a comprehensive portrait of the genome of the world’s first immortal cell line, known as HeLa. The cell line was derived in 1951 from an aggressive cervical cancer that killed Henrietta Lacks, a 31-year-old African-American tobacco farmer and mother of five – the subject of the 2010 New York Times best-seller, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” They will also be...

2013-08-08 10:14:45

The National Institutes of Health today announced in Nature that it has reached an understanding with the family of the late Henrietta Lacks to allow biomedical researchers controlled access to the whole genome data of cells derived from her tumor, commonly known as HeLa cells. These cells have already been used extensively in scientific research and have helped make possible some of the most important medical advances of the past 60 years. These include the development of modern vaccines,...