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Latest National Oceanography Center Stories

Scientists To Study Underground Lake In Antarctica
2011-10-11 09:43:06

An Antarctic lake hidden under 1.8 miles of ice in the western region of the continent could reveal what life on Earth looked like a million years ago and could narrow down the search for extraterrestrial life, as well as give scientists clues to future climate impacts, according to a British expedition taking up the study. Expedition members will use hot water to melt down through the nearly 2-mile-thick ice to reach Lake Ellsworth, which has been isolated from the outside world for more...

2010-03-08 12:57:39

Acantharian cyst sedimentation Spore-like reproductive cysts of enigmatic organisms called acantharians rapidly sink from surface waters to the deep ocean in certain regions, according to new research. Scientists suspect that this is part of an extraordinary reproductive strategy, which allows juveniles to exploit a seasonal food bonanza. The research shows that deep sedimentation of cysts during the spring delivers significant amounts of organic matter to the ocean depths, providing a...

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2009-10-21 10:05:55

The world's oldest known submerged town has been revealed through the discovery of late Neolithic pottery. The finds were made during an archaeological survey of Pavlopetri, off the southern Laconia coast of Greece. Marine geo-archaeologist Dr Nic Flemming of the National Oceanography Center, Southampton said: "The discovery of Neolithic pottery is incredible! It means that we are looking at a port city which may be 5000-6000 years old, with trade goods and wrecks nearby showing some of the...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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