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Bengal
2007-12-14 05:21:54

The Bengal is a hybrid breed of cat bred to have the markings of a wildcat but the temperament of a housecat. The Bengal is reminiscent of and named after the Asian Leopard Cat (Prionailurus bengalensis); the Bengal Tiger species is completely unrelated. It is a medium sized cat weighing around 8-10 lb for females and 15 lb for males. They are a hybrid breed developed through a program of...

Liger
2007-01-19 19:10:49

The liger, is a hybrid cross between a male panthera leo (lion), and a female panthera tigris (Tiger) and is denoted scientifically as panthera leo x panthera tigris. A liger resembles a giant lion with diffused stripes. They are the largest cats in the world, although the Siberian Tiger is the largest pure breed. Like tigers, ligers enjoy swimming. The offspring of a male tiger and a female...

Amur Tiger Siberian
2007-01-19 15:00:55

The amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) is a rare subspecies of tiger (P. tigris). Also known as the Siberian, Korean, Manchurian, or North China Tiger, it is the largest natural animal in the feline family Felidae. The amur tiger is critically endangered. In the early 1900s, it lived throughout the Korean Peninsula, northeastern Mongolia, southeastern Russia, and northeastern China. Today,...

Sumatran Tiger
2007-01-19 14:51:36

The Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. The wild population is estimated at between 400 and 500 animals, occurring predominantly in the island's national parks. Recent genetic testing has revealed the presence of unique genetic markers. They indicate that it may develop into a separate species, if it is not made extinct. This has led to...

Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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