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Latest Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act Stories

Most Complete Ancient Skeleton From New World Sheds New Light On Human Migration
2014-05-16 07:33:27

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of scientists have uncovered the most genetically complete human skeleton from the New World yet, dating back more than 12,000 years. The skeleton, discovered in an underwater cave system in the Yucatan Peninsula, is that of a 12-year-old girl who fell into the once dry open pit, breaking her pelvis and likely killing her instantly from the 190-foot fall, according to researchers. Now, the team, a body of...

2011-06-13 07:15:00

WASHINGTON, June 13, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Smithsonian Institution's process to repatriate thousands of Native American human remains and funerary objects in its collections is lengthy and resource intensive and it may take several more decades to return items to tribes under its current system, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). This GAO report is the second of a two-part, three-year effort to examine how publicly funded institutions are...

2008-07-12 06:00:00

An aging American Indian with rotting teeth and arthritic joints sat down and died in the Utah desert outside Escalante with a musket, ammunition and a bucket. Blowing sand covered his corpse for more than a century before a hiker stumbled across it last year. This is the likely scenario of how a nearly complete skeleton, dubbed "Escalante Man" in BLM documents, came to be buried a few hundred paces off Highway 12 in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. What remains a mystery is...

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2007-12-01 19:25:00

WASHINGTON -- Scientists hoping to study the ancient skeleton known as Kennewick Man are protesting efforts that they say could block them from examining one of the oldest and most complete set of bones ever found in North America. For the third time in four years, the scientists oppose a Senate bill that would allow federally recognized tribes to claim ancient remains even if they can't prove a link to a current tribe. They also are contesting draft regulations issued by the Bush...

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2006-08-11 00:00:00

YAKIMA, Wash. - A federal law governing protection of American Indian graves would be amended to allow scientific study of ancient remains discovered on federal lands if the remains have not been tied to a current tribe, under a bill proposed by U.S. Rep. Doc Hastings. The bill marks the latest step in a dispute sparked by the discovery of Kennewick Man, one of the oldest and most complete skeletons ever found in North America. Indian tribes and researchers battled over rights to the...

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2006-02-24 08:56:32

WASHINGTON -- Kennewick Man was laid to rest alongside a river more than 9,000 years ago, buried by other people, a leading forensic scientist said Thursday. The skeleton, one of the oldest and most complete ever found in North America, has been under close analysis since courts sided with researchers in a legal battle with Indian tribes in the Northwest who wanted the remains found near the Columbia River reburied without study. Douglas Owsley, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian's...

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2005-07-07 07:15:45

SEATTLE -- Scientists Wednesday began studying the 9,300-year-old remains of Kennewick Man, one of the oldest and most complete skeletons ever found in North America - and focus of a long legal battle between researchers and Northwest Indian tribes. The remains have been under lock and key since 1998 at the University of Washington's Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture. A group of 11 researchers from around the country has gathered for the first comprehensive study of the...

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2005-06-28 21:19:16

PORTLAND, Ore. -- After nearly a decade of court battles, scientists plan to begin studying the 9,300-year-old skeleton known as Kennewick Man next week. A team of scientists plans to examine the bones at the University of Washington's Burke Museum in Seattle beginning July 6, according to their attorney, Alan Schneider. Four Northwest Indian tribes had opposed the study, claiming the skeleton could be an ancestor who should be buried. The Interior Department and the Army Corps of Engineers...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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