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Latest Native American history Stories

2008-06-30 21:02:35

By Andrew Rafferty William McCullough had some unfinished business to take care of before Seneca Vocational High School completed its final commencement on Sunday. The Class of 1945 graduate had to participate in the commencement ceremony. After three years attending Seneca, McCullough left the East Side school in 1944 to serve in the U.S. Army Air Corps in the South Pacific during World War II. He continued taking classes in the service and attended night classes when he returned home....

2008-06-25 03:02:20

By Fie, Shannon M Abstract This paper examines the exchange of Middle Woodland ceramics within the Havana region of the Hopewell Interaction Sphere. Ceramics from six lower Illinois Valley sites and samples of surrounding days are examined using neutron activation analysis. Statistical evaluation of the elemental data reveals the presence of foreign ceramics in all six site samples. The local ceramics encompass a variety of both fine and coarse wares, including several sherds initially...

2008-06-18 06:00:14

By The Fayetteville Observer, N.C. Jun. 18--Two housing programs in Hoke and Lee counties were awarded $325,000 in grants to help with repairs and other work. The Lumbee tribe was awarded a $250,000 Community Development Block Grant to install water and sewer lines in its housing development in Hoke County. The city of Sanford was awarded a $75,000 grant to help with urgent home repairs. The state Department of Commerce announced the grants Tuesday. In Hoke County, the Lumbee tribe...

2008-06-17 18:00:38

By Alice Thrasher, The Fayetteville Observer, N.C. Jun. 17--When power bills arrive to cover the cost of staying cool during June's record-breaking heat wave, customers may be surprised. "Some of the loads we are seeing are what we usually see for July because we have had a much hotter summer so far," PWC spokeswoman Carolyn Justice-Hinson said last week. "Unless people have changed and are being very conscious of thermostat settings, definitely the hot weather is going to impact their...

2008-06-17 06:00:35

By Alice Thrasher, The Fayetteville Observer, N.C. Jun. 17--hen power bills arrive to cover the cost of staying cool during June's record-breaking heat wave, customers may be surprised. "Some of the loads we are seeing are what we usually see for July because we have had a much hotter summer so far," PWC spokeswoman Carolyn Justice-Hinson said last week. "Unless people have changed and are being very conscious of thermostat settings, definitely the hot weather is going to impact their...

2008-04-04 09:00:12

By Steve Connor Science Editor Textbook accounts of how the Americas were first populated may have to be re-written after the discovery in Oregon of the oldest human DNA ever recorded. The DNA dates from 14,300 years ago - about 1,200 years before the oldest human artifacts produced by the Clovis people, who were thought to be the first inhabitants of North America. The Oregon find suggests that the Clovis people were preceded by cultures who lived along the west coast of North America...

2007-06-11 09:00:13

By Catherine Kozak, The Virginian-Pilot, Norfolk, Va. Jun. 11--A DNA testing company and a genealogy enthusiast say they're trying to achieve what archaeologists have so far failed to do: find out what happened to the Lost Colony, the 1587 settlement on Roanoke Island that disappeared without a wisp of evidence. "The Lost Colony story is the biggest unsolved mystery in the history of America," said Roberta Estes, owner of DNA Explain, a private DNA analysis company based in Brighton,...

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2007-05-17 00:05:00

PITTSBURGH - About two weeks ago, archaeologist Tom Kutys thought he'd found a stone wall when he came across mortared capstones in a trench at the state park that once was the site of French and British forts. Instead, archaeologists at Point State Park believe they very well might have uncovered long-buried remnants of Fort Duquesne, Pittsburgh's original fort. "If we are correct about this, we are looking at the earliest example of European masonry in Pittsburgh," said Brooke Blades, an...

2006-12-26 15:00:08

By CAROL HARVEY, PHOTO BY LUIS SNCHEZ SATURNO SECOND PLACE: ADULT NONFICTION Hokam From the whispered information I overheard at the Santa Fe Indian Hospital, it turned out she had been living and working in the garment district in Los Angeles. Her daughter, Lisa, was 9. A hospital there had tracked down Moma, and said, "We think we may have your daughter." As I sat near her, a tangle of tubes sustaining her, I said, "Jeanie, wake up. Come on, let's go to Apache Canyon. We'll climb the...

2006-05-18 08:55:00

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- Opening a bridge construction yard on what turned out to be an ancient Indian village and burial ground was "a very expensive misadventure" that the state can learn from, according to an internal report on the blunder. State Transportation Secretary Doug MacDonald released the detailed internal review at Tuesday's meeting of the state Transportation Commission. The review concluded that the project's demise could be seen as a cautionary tale about being more diligent when...


Latest Native American history Reference Libraries

Lodgepole Pine, Pinus contorta
2014-04-27 08:06:16

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is found in western North America in the upper mountains and subalpine regions of Colorado’s northern Rocky Mountains. This tree is considered to be invasive in New Zealand. This tree is also known as the shore pine, twisted pine, and contorta pine as well as black pine, scrub pine, and coast pine. The Lodgepole pine grows best between 8000 and 10,000 feet above sea level. They like to grow in well-drained, slightly acidic, sandy soils on gentle south...

Finger Lakes National Forest
2013-12-24 11:03:56

The Finger Lakes National Forest is made up of 16,259 acres of Seneca and Schuyler counties, located between Seneca Lake and Cayuha Lake in the Finger Lakes Region of New York within the United States of America. The forest has over 30 miles of interconnecting trails that cross ravines, pastures, woodlands, and gorges. Although roughly 3.2 million acres of New York State is located in State Forest Preserves, Wildlife Management Areas, and Forests, there are few large areas of public land...

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Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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