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Latest Natural environment Stories

Image 1 - Past Disturbances Obscure Warming Impacts On Forests
2012-03-05 10:46:29

Past disturbances, such as logging, can obscure the effects of climate change on forest ecosystems. So reports a study just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The paper, exploring nitrogen dynamics, found that untangling climate impacts from other factors can be difficult, even when scientists have access to decades of data on a forest's environmental conditions. Co-author Dr. Gene E. Likens of the Cary Institute comments, "Understanding how climate change is...

2012-01-19 11:27:07

Highlights signs of transition to a disturbance-dominated regime A new paper published today in Nature reveals that human land use activity has begun to change the regional water and energy cycles - the interplay of air coming in from the Atlantic Ocean, water transpiration by the forest, and solar radiation - of parts of the Amazon basin. In addition, it shows that ongoing interactions between deforestation, fire, and climate change have the potential to alter carbon storage, rainfall...

2011-12-12 17:05:36

A review carried out by a group of international specialists has identified several emerging issues that are likely to damage biodiversity in the coming years. The review was conducted by 22 specialists from 20 institutions, including the University of Cambridge and the European Centre for Environment and Human Health, and aims to provide a 'critical list' of issues that need investigating in the near future. The analysis focused on changes in climate, technology and human behavior,...

2011-11-28 10:18:35

Much of our knowledge about past life has come from the fossil record — but how accurately does that reflect the true history and drivers of biodiversity on Earth? "It's a question that goes back a long way to the time of Darwin, who looked at the fossil record and tried to understand what it tells us about the history of life," says Shanan Peters, an assistant professor of geoscience at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. In fact, the fossil record can tell us a great...

Image 1 - Ancient Environment Led To Current Marine Biodiversity
2011-11-28 05:49:20

Changes in global carbon, sulfur cycles and to sea-level fueled biological responses Much of our knowledge about past life has come from the fossil record, but how accurately does that record reflect the true history and drivers of biodiversity on Earth? "It's a question that goes back a long way to the time of Darwin, who looked at the fossil record and tried to understand what it tells us about the history of life," says Shanan Peters, a geoscientist at the University of...

2011-09-21 06:59:14

National Science Foundation Grants Awarded for Research on Coupled Natural and Human Systems Water quality and environmental health in Botswana; wetlands in a working landscape; the collapse of the ancient Maya and what that has to tell us about society and environmental change today. These and other projects that address how humans and the environment interact are the focus of $21 million in National Science Foundation (NSF) grants to scientists, engineers and educators across the...

2011-02-22 21:37:44

People who want to eat healthy and live sustainably have a new way to measure their impact on the environment: a Web-based tool that calculates an individual's "nitrogen footprint." The device was created by University of Virginia environmental scientist James N. Galloway; Allison Leach, a staff research assistant at U.Va.; and colleagues from the Netherlands and the University of Maryland. The calculator is a project of the International Nitrogen Initiative, a global network of scientists...

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2011-02-10 09:09:05

A coupled-cycles framework is essential to balancing human needs with the health of the planet If society wants to address big picture environmental problems, like global climate change, acid rain, and coastal dead zones, we need to pay closer attention to the Earth's coupled biogeochemical cycles. So reports a special issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, published this month by the Ecological Society of America. "There are nearly seven billion people on the planet. And our...

2011-02-03 01:31:15

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment issue examines the basic elements of life In the search for life on Mars or any planet, there is much more than the presence of carbon and oxygen to consider. Using Earth's biogeochemical cycles as a reference point, elements like nitrogen, iron and sulfur are just as important for supporting life. As explored in studies published in February's open-access Special Issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, the most basic elements work together...

2010-07-01 15:58:47

Scientists find excess nitrogen favors plants that respond poorly to rising CO2 As atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rise, so does the pressure on the plant kingdom. The hope among policymakers, scientists and concerned citizens is that plants will absorb some of the extra CO2 and mitigate the impacts of climate change. For a few decades now, researchers have hypothesized about one major roadblock: nitrogen. Plants build their tissue primarily with the CO2 they take up from the atmosphere....


Latest Natural environment Reference Libraries

Environmental Science
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Environmental science is a science that contains a wide range of scientific disciplines. These disciplines are grouped together based on the natural environment which they encompass and interact with. These sciences include physical, chemical, and biological components. Environmental science provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environmental systems. The most common way environmental science is studied is through the work of one individual or small team drawing on the...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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