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Latest Natural environment Stories

2011-02-03 01:31:15

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment issue examines the basic elements of life In the search for life on Mars or any planet, there is much more than the presence of carbon and oxygen to consider. Using Earth's biogeochemical cycles as a reference point, elements like nitrogen, iron and sulfur are just as important for supporting life. As explored in studies published in February's open-access Special Issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, the most basic elements work together...

2010-07-01 15:58:47

Scientists find excess nitrogen favors plants that respond poorly to rising CO2 As atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rise, so does the pressure on the plant kingdom. The hope among policymakers, scientists and concerned citizens is that plants will absorb some of the extra CO2 and mitigate the impacts of climate change. For a few decades now, researchers have hypothesized about one major roadblock: nitrogen. Plants build their tissue primarily with the CO2 they take up from the atmosphere....

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2010-03-29 06:25:00

Extraordinarily rare springs high above the rest of the world in the Arctic could serve as Earth's own little version of Europa, helping scientists picture what life might face on the mysterious Jovian moon. Europa is covered with sulfur-rich materials concentrated along cracks and ridges on its icy surface, which could hold the only clues we currently have about the composition of its hidden underground ocean. These compounds in the ice might even contain organic material that migrated...

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2010-03-24 11:12:55

Some regions of the deep ocean floor support abundant populations of organisms, despite being overlain by water that contains very little oxygen, according to an international study led by scientists at the United Kingdom's National Oceanography Center, Southampton. But global warming is likely to exacerbate oxygen depletion and thereby reduce biodiversity in these regions, they warn. The sunlit surface waters tend to be well oxygenated as a result of their connection with the atmosphere....

2010-01-26 15:10:00

Ecologists outline necessary actions for mitigating and adapting to a changing climate Global warming may impair the ability of ecosystems to perform vital services -- such as providing food, clean water and carbon sequestration -- says the nation's largest organization of ecological scientists. In a statement released today, the Ecological Society of America (ESA) outlines strategies that focus on restoring and maintaining natural ecosystem functions to mitigate and adapt to climate change....

2010-01-22 00:39:31

Weizmann Institute scientists show that in one kind of forest, its 'energy budget' includes significant reserves of heat The simple formula we've learned in recent years "“ forests remove the greenhouse gas CO2 from the atmosphere; therefore forests prevent global warming "“ may not be quite as simple as we thought. Forests can directly absorb and retain heat, and, in at least one type of forest, these effects may be strong enough to cancel out a good part of the benefit in...

2009-10-16 10:20:43

Economists, assigning values to 'ecosystem services,' report staggering totals and rates of return on investment Experts concluding the global DIVERSITAS biodiversity conference today in Cape Town described preliminary research revealing jaw-dropping dollar values of the "ecosystem services" of biomes like forests and coral reefs "“ including food, pollution treatment and climate regulation. Undertaken to help societies make better-informed choices, the economic research shows a single...

2009-10-15 12:40:59

Sustainable water use, climate change impacts on international markets, restoration of Chicago ecosystems among research projects How do humans and their environment interact, and how can we use knowledge of these links to adapt to a planet undergoing radical climate and other environmental changes? To answer these and related questions, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded 14 grants to scientists, engineers and educators across the country to study coupled natural and human...

2009-09-24 08:48:44

Humanity needs to act now to avoid threats to human well-being caused by irreversible damage to the Earth, its climate, species and life-supporting systems. Scientists say it has become essential to define what levels of such human-caused change are "Ëœsafe' and which are "Ëœunsafe', and to stay within these boundaries. The call comes from 28 of the world's most eminent environmental scientists, published today in the world's leading science journal, Nature. The...

2009-08-06 10:03:51

Geoengineering techniques aim to slow global warming through the use of human-made changes to the Earth's land, seas or atmosphere. But new research shows that the use of geoengineering to do environmental good may cause other environmental harm. In a symposium at the Ecological Society of America's Annual Meeting, ecologists discuss the viability of geoengineering, concluding that it is potentially dangerous at the global scale, where the risks outweigh the benefits."The bigger the scale of...


Latest Natural environment Reference Libraries

Environmental Science
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Environmental science is a science that contains a wide range of scientific disciplines. These disciplines are grouped together based on the natural environment which they encompass and interact with. These sciences include physical, chemical, and biological components. Environmental science provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environmental systems. The most common way environmental science is studied is through the work of one individual or small team drawing on the...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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