Quantcast

Latest Natural selection Stories

Two Mouths For One Worm
2013-11-07 11:58:54

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft A devious evolutionary path between genetics and environment Depending on the environment in which the worm grows, the larva of the roundworm Pristionchus pacificus develops into either a wide-mouthed predator or a narrow-mouthed bacteria eater. A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Tübingen, Germany, headed by Ralf J. Sommer have now discovered a developmental biological switch that determines the worm's mouth form....

Butterflies Offer Insights Into Evolution
2013-10-31 16:39:31

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the University of Chicago finds it’s genetically easier to spin off into a new species than it may have once been thought, even if the two species remain close and interbreed with one another. After studying butterflies, the researchers found evolution can happen as the result of a process rather than a single event. In fact, in the case of butterflies, the beginning of a new species could begin with something as...

2013-09-18 15:43:41

Saving energy is important for humans and animals alike when resources are limited. Scientists at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, found out that although higher-ranked red deer gain privileged access to patches of food, they also have higher metabolic rates and thus use more energy. This can be a serious disadvantage in winter when red deer rely largely on their limited stored body fat to survive. Energy budget adjustments...

Females Choose Biological Fitness Over Other Traits In Mating Game
2013-06-20 10:46:19

National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis When a new species emerges following adaptive changes to its local environment, the process of choosing a mate can help protect the new species' genetic identity and increase the likelihood of its survival. But of the many observable traits in a potential mate, which particular traits does a female tend to prefer? A new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis finds that a female's mating...

2013-05-22 10:17:41

Rice computational study tracks E. coli cells´ regulatory mechanisms Environment is not the only factor in shaping regulatory patterns – and it might not even be the primary factor, according to a new Rice University study that looks at how cells´ protein networks relate to a bacteria´s genome. The Rice lab of computer scientist Luay Nakhleh reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that when environmental factors are eliminated from an...

Natural Selection Keeps Up As People Live Longer And Reproduce Less
2013-04-25 15:59:54

Cell Press In many places around the world, people are living longer and are having fewer children. But that's not all. A study of people living in rural Gambia, published in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 25, shows that this modern-day "demographic transition" may lead women to be taller and slimmer, too. "This is a reminder that declines in mortality rates do not necessarily mean that evolution stops, but that it changes," says Ian Rickard of Durham University in the...

Evolution Of Bacteria Has Become Predictable
2013-02-20 19:24:20

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The principles of evolution are widely accepted, but the causes and mechanisms that drive evolution are still heavily debated. In a new study published in the open access journal PLOS Biology, two researchers found similar or identical genetic mutations can emerge in separate populations of E. coli evolving in different environments for over 1000 generations, leading the team to conclude that evolution can be fairly...

Mutant Champions Save Vulnerable Species From Almost-certain Extinction
2013-02-20 12:52:16

University of Washington Species facing widespread and rapid environmental changes can sometimes evolve quickly enough to dodge the extinction bullet. Populations of disease-causing bacteria evolve, for example, as doctors flood their “environment,” the human body, with antibiotics. Insects, animals and plants can make evolutionary adaptations in response to pesticides, heavy metals and overfishing. Previous studies have shown that the more gradual the change, the better the...

Genetic Variation Helped Humans Evolve, Adapt To Climate Changes
2013-02-15 10:05:03

[Watch Video: 2 Studies Reveal Genetic Variation That Drives Human Evolution] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New light has been shed on a genetic variation that may have played a key role in human evolution by two studies published by an international group of researchers this week in the journal Cell. To understand a gene variant that might have helped humans adapt to humid climates, the research team used an animal model, along with whole-genome sequencing...

2012-12-29 05:00:30

In a comparison made between the actual progress of evolution and how it would have progressed if the mechanism had been genetic mutation and natural selection, the two progress in opposite directions. According to website http://www.takeondarwin.com, claims made for the Modern Synthesis are contradicted by what is known of the actual progress of evolution. ROSENDALE, NY (PRWEB) December 28, 2012 In Evolution Issue of the Month 8 published on the website http://www.takeondarwin.com...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
Related