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Latest Nature Biotechnology Stories

2009-12-28 13:10:18

Publication in Nature Biotechnology validates company's structure-based approach for addressing previously undruggable targets Emerald BioStructures (formerly deCODE biostructures) announced today a publication in the December 27, 2009 advance online issue of Nature Biotechnology, detailing the application of structure-based drug design (SBDD) to engineer new allosteric small molecule modulators of the enzyme phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), with reduced side effects. According to the paper, the...

2009-12-10 17:33:36

Global climate change has prompted efforts to drastically reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas produced by burning fossil fuels. In a new approach, researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have genetically modified a cyanobacterium to consume carbon dioxide and produce the liquid fuel isobutanol, which holds great potential as a gasoline alternative. The reaction is powered directly by energy from sunlight, through photosynthesis. The...

2009-09-08 06:00:00

RICHMOND, Calif., Sept. 8 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Scientists from The Whitehead Institute used zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed by Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., (Nasdaq: SGMO) to efficiently and precisely modify the genomes of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Human ESCs and iPSCs are useful tools in drug discovery and development. Scientists also hope to use these cells therapeutically in transplantation medicine and other regenerative...

2009-08-16 13:07:39

A study published in this week's online issue of Nature Biotechnology, demonstrates a unique and highly sensitive method for detecting methylation-associated cancers. Chemical modification of DNA via the addition or deletion of methyl groups has been established as a common biological means of activating or silencing genes. Abnormal levels of DNA methylation, which effectively disrupt the genes responsible for normal cell cycle regulation, has been implicated in a number of different cancers,...

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2009-08-11 06:10:00

When scientists first mapped out the human DNA in 2001, each attempt cost hundreds of millions of dollars and took an average of 250 people. In 2008, when the cost was $250,000, genome sequencing still took 200 people. In a paper available on Aug. 9 in Nature Biotechnology, a Stanford University professor announces that sequencing his entire genome took $50,000 and two other people. Basically, a task that cost the amount of a Boeing 747 airplane and needed enough people to fill half the plane...

2009-05-04 10:08:53

Molecules that selectively interfere with protein production can stop human cells from making the abnormal molecules that cause Huntington's disease, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. These man-made molecules also were effective against the abnormal protein that causes Machado-Joseph disease, a neurological condition similar to Huntington's. The work has been done only in cultured cells, and it will take years before the effectiveness of this process can be tested in...

2009-04-13 07:43:45

A team of UCSF researchers has for the first time used tiny molecules called microRNAs to help turn adult mouse cells back to their embryonic state. These reprogrammed cells are pluripotent, meaning that, like embryonic stem cells, they have the capacity to become any cell type in the body. The findings suggest that scientists will soon be able to replace retroviruses and even genes currently used in laboratory experiments to induce pluripotency in adult cells. This would make potential stem...

2009-03-06 06:47:00

- Company Receives Allowance of Patent Claims in the U.S. and in India - - InNexus Biotechnology CEO Highlighted in Nature Biotechnology - BRITISH COLUMBIA, Canada, March 6 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- InNexus Biotechnology Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: IXSBF; TSX VENTURE: IXS; http://www.ixsbio.com), a drug development company commercializing the next generation of monoclonal antibodies based on its Dynamic Cross Linking (DXL(TM)) technology, announces that it has received a notice of allowance...

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2008-11-26 12:23:39

A new "barcode chip" developed by researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) promises to revolutionize diagnostic medical testing. In less than 10 minutes, and using just a pinprick's worth of blood, the chip can measure the concentrations of dozens of proteins, including those that herald the presence of diseases like cancer and heart disease. The device, known as the Integrated Blood-Barcode Chip, or IBBC, was developed by a group of Caltech researchers led by James R....

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2008-10-13 13:15:00

Researchers said on Sunday they found a shortcut to transforming ordinary skin cells into powerful stem cells by "sprinkling" a chemical onto the cells. The team at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute in Massachusetts added the chemical to use just two genes to transform ordinary human skin cells into more powerful induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells. "This study demonstrates there's a possibility that instead of using genes and viruses to reprogram cells, one can use chemicals," said Dr....