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Latest Nature Geoscience Stories

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2010-05-17 06:25:00

Lake Tanganyika, the second oldest and the second-deepest lake in the world, could be in for some rough waters. Geologists led by Brown University have determined the east African rift lake has experienced unprecedented warming during the last century, and its surface waters are the warmest on record. That finding is important, the scientists write in the journal Nature Geoscience, because the warm surface waters likely will affect fish stocks upon which millions of people in the region...

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2010-04-26 08:10:10

Key players in carbon cycle multiply slowly when overheated In dark, rich soils on every continent, microbes dealing with the effects of climate change aren't accelerating global warming the way scientists had predicted, a study by researchers at the University of California at Irvine, Colorado State University and Yale University shows. Results of the study appear in a paper published on-line this week in the journal Nature Geoscience. The work was supported by the National Science...

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2010-04-26 07:37:10

In so many ways, Don Juan Pond in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica is one of the most unearthly places on the planet. An ankle-deep mirror between mountain peaks and rubbled moraine, the pond is an astonishing 18 times saltier than the Earth's oceans and virtually never freezes, even in temperatures of more than 40 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. Now, a research team led by biogeochemists from the University of Georgia has discovered at the site a previously unreported chemical mechanism for the...

2010-04-06 13:57:48

In an analysis of the past 1.2 million years, UC Santa Barbara geologist Lorraine Lisiecki discovered a pattern that connects the regular changes of the Earth's orbital cycle to changes in the Earth's climate. The finding is reported in this week's issue of the scientific journal Nature Geoscience. Lisiecki performed her analysis of climate by examining ocean sediment cores. These cores come from 57 locations around the world. By analyzing sediments, scientists are able to chart the Earth's...

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2010-04-05 10:48:01

A study showed on Sunday that thawing permafrost could release laughing gas, which is a contributor to climate change that has been overlooked in the Arctic, according to a recent Reuters report. The study, which was reported in the journal Nature Geoscience, showed that emissions of nitrous oxide surged under certain conditions from melting permafrost that underlies around 25 percent of land in the Northern Hemisphere. Emissions of the gas leapt 20 times from thawing wetlands in Zackenberg...

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2010-03-15 09:57:40

Australian and US scientists have discovered how changes in winds blowing on the Southern Ocean drive variations in the depth of the surface layer of sea water responsible for regulating exchanges of heat and carbon dioxide between the ocean and the atmosphere. The researchers' findings "“ published on-line today in Nature Geoscience "“ provide new insights into natural processes which have a major influence on the rate of climate change. The surface-mixed layer is a crucial...

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2010-03-02 11:17:07

The melting of glaciers is well documented, but when looking at the rate at which they have been retreating, a team of international researchers steps back and says not so fast. Previous studies have largely overestimated mass loss from Alaskan glaciers over the past 40-plus years, according to Erik Schiefer, a Northern Arizona University geographer who coauthored a paper in the February issue of Nature Geoscience that recalculates glacier melt in Alaska. The research team, led by...

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2010-03-01 13:02:12

An asteroid strike may not only account for the demise of ocean and land life 65 million years ago, but the fireball's path and the resulting dust, darkness and toxic metal contamination may explain the geographic unevenness of extinctions and recovery, according to Penn State geoscientists. "Our results shed light on the causes of nannoplankton extinction, how productivity was restored, the factors that controlled the origination of new species, and, ultimately, how phytoplankton influenced...

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2010-03-01 10:25:00

Nanoparticles are atmospheric materials so small that they can't be seen with the naked eye, but they can very visibly affect both weather patterns and human health all over the world "“ and not in a good way, according to a study by a team of researchers at Texas A&M University. Researchers Renyi Zhang, Alexei Khalizov, Jun Zheng, Wen Xu, Yan Ma and Vinita Lal in the Departments of Atmospheric Sciences and Chemistry say that nanoparticles appear to be growing in many parts of the...

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2010-02-23 06:50:00

Researchers are tracking Indian Ocean climate patterns with the possibility that they will improve early-warning systems for the El Nino phenomenon, which could save countless lives and billions of dollars lost each year to the severe weather it causes. Researchers from Japan and France said their new forecast model may predict an El Nino up to 14 months ahead of time, several months earlier than with current models. A paper on the project was published in the journal Nature Geoscience. "It...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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