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Latest Nature Medicine Stories

2011-09-06 12:45:41

  An experimental vaccine composed of a genetically modified bacterium closely related to the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB) has been found to protect mice against TB infection, according to a study appearing online September 4 in the journal Nature Medicine. The research was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health. TB, a respiratory disease that according to World Health Organization estimates...

2011-09-05 11:40:18

Study finds inflammation may be part of the solution, not the problem Increased low-grade inflammation in the body resulting from obesity is widely viewed as contributing to type 2 diabetes. Going against this long-held belief, researchers from Children's Hospital Boston report that two proteins activated by inflammation are actually crucial for maintaining good blood sugar levels — and that boosting the activity of these proteins can normalize blood sugar in severely obese and...

2011-09-05 11:25:46

Human colon stem cells have been identified and grown in a lab-plate for the first time Human colon stem cells have been identified and grown in a lab-plate for the first time. This achievement, made by researchers of the Colorectal Cancer Lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and published in Nature Medicine, is a crucial advance towards regenerative medicine. Throughout life, stem cells of the colon regenerate the inner layer of our large intestine in a...

2011-09-05 11:16:45

A potential vaccine against tuberculosis has been found to completely eliminate tuberculosis bacteria from infected tissues in some mice. The vaccine was created with a strain of bacteria that, due to the absence of a few genes, are unable to avoid its host's first-line immune response. Once this first-line defense has been activated, it triggers the more specific immune response that can protect against future infections. The research, by scientists at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute,...

TB Vaccine Shows Promising Results In Lab Tests
2011-09-05 04:48:52

  Scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine reported on Sunday that a vaccine they developed for tuberculosis had shown promising results during early laboratory testing in mice. Professor William Jacobs and colleagues, who published their findings in the journal Nature Medicine on Sunday, worked with Mycobacterium smegmatis, a species similar to tuberculosis that is lethal in mice but harmless to humans. "The researchers created a version of M. smegmatis lacking a...

2011-08-29 12:59:19

Reconnecting severed blood vessels is mostly done the same way today – with sutures – as it was 100 years ago, when the French surgeon Alexis Carrel won a Nobel Prize for advancing the technique. Now, a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has developed a sutureless method that appears to be a faster, safer and easier alternative. In animal studies, a team led by Stanford microsurgeon Geoffrey Gurtner, MD, used a poloxamer gel and bioadhesive rather...

2011-08-29 12:10:19

Paving the way for personalized treatment Cancer scientists have long debated whether all cells within a tumour are equal or whether some cancer cells are more potent - a question that has been highly investigated in experimental models in the last decade. Research published today in Nature Medicine (10.1038/nm.2415) focuses on patients and shows that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) contains rare cells with stem cell properties, called leukemia stem cells (LSC), that are better at predicting...

2011-08-29 11:33:08

Obesity is growing at alarming rates worldwide, and the biggest culprit is overeating. In a study of brain circuits that control hunger and satiety, Yale School of Medicine researchers have found that molecular mechanisms controlling free radicals–molecules tied to aging and tissue damage–are at the heart of increased appetite in diet-induced obesity. Published Aug. 28 in the advanced online issue of Nature Medicine, the study found that elevating free radical levels in the...

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2011-08-22 20:02:26

Novel approach may offer treatment for other bacterial diseases Researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a molecular process by which the body can defend against the effects of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), pointing the way to a promising new approach for treating an intestinal disease that has become more common, more severe and harder to cure in recent years. In the U.S., several million...

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2011-08-22 15:09:17

Researchers may have discovered an impressive new weapon in the struggle against hospital-acquired bacterial infections, Reuters is reporting. Clostridium difficile is an antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection that can cause diarrhea, colitis, the inflammation of the colon. At its worst, it can be fatal and is often spread around hospitals and medical facilities. Tests of an experimental compound are mimicking the human defense mechanism, used by cells in the gut to neutralize harmful...


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Nature Medicine
2012-09-24 08:10:29

Nature Medicine is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1995 and published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. As with other Nature journals, this periodical has no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team. Nature Medicine publishes research articles, reviews, news and commentary pieces. Topics include cancer, cardiovascular disease, gene therapy, immunology, vaccines, and neuroscience. Research...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.