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2011-08-15 15:37:32

Finding ends 5-decade search Researchers at the University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), St. Paul's Hospital and the University of British Columbia have identified a new treatment target for a virus that causes severe lung infections and an estimated 10% of common colds. The virus, called human respiratory syncytial virus or RSV, is the most common reason for hospitalization of infants and children under two years of age; currently there is no effective therapy or...

2011-08-12 12:12:17

Published online on Aug. 7, 2011, the journal Nature Medicine reports that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including ibuprofen reduce the severity of postpartum breast cancers in animal models. "We caution patients and providers that because a mother's body is undergoing radical changes during this time, we can't yet speak to the safety of these drugs for women diagnosed with or at risk for postpartum breast cancer, and thus can't yet recommend NSAIDs as a preventative therapy or cancer...

2011-08-02 15:23:47

VIB researchers have developed a mouse model for Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, a hereditary disease of the peripheral nervous system. They also found a potential therapy for this incurable disease. The treatment not only halted the damage to the nerves and the atrophy of the muscles, it even succeeded in reversing the symptoms. The research was conducted under supervision of Wim Robberecht en Ludo Van Den Bosch from VIB-K.U.Leuven, in collaboration with the team of Vincent Timmerman...

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2011-08-01 09:15:00

An inexpensive and portable blood test could provide a breakthrough in diagnosing infections and has been proven as accurate as expensive hospital-based testing in the detection of HIV, syphilis and other diseases, according to a new study released Sunday. Samuel K. Sia, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, has developed the innovative strategy for an integrated microfluidic-based diagnostic device. The mChip, as it is called, has been tested with hundreds...

2011-07-25 14:16:09

A genome-wide association study published in the August issue of Nature Medicine has found two tiny genetic variations that can predict which patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma are most likely to develop radiation-induced second cancers years after treatment. Knowing in advance who is at risk could help physicians tailor treatment to reduce the risks for patients who are most susceptible to long-term damage. Hodgkin's lymphoma is one of the most treatable cancers, with more than 90 percent of...

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2011-07-12 08:12:54

MicroOCT may greatly improve understanding, diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a one-micrometer-resolution version of the intravascular imaging technology optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can reveal cellular and subcellular features of coronary artery disease. In a Nature Medicine paper receiving advance online publication, the investigators describe how microOCT...

2011-06-30 13:41:10

Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have demonstrated a molecular strategy they say could make a much larger variety of tumors treatable with PARP inhibitors, a promising new class of cancer drugs. Currently, the role of PARP inhibitors has mainly been restricted to cancers whose cells lack functioning versions of the damage-repair proteins BRCA1 or BRCA2 -- chiefly certain breast and ovarian cancers. In a paper published online by Nature Medicine, Geoffrey Shapiro, MD, and colleagues...

2011-06-27 21:10:07

Sooty mangabeys, a type of African monkey, have intrigued scientists for years because they can survive infection by SIV, a relative of HIV, and not succumb to AIDS. Researchers have identified a way some of sooty mangabeys' immune cells resist infection: they close the gates that SIV and HIV use to get into the cell. The findings may lead to strategies to help HIV-infected individuals cope better with infection. The results are published online in the journal Nature Medicine. "We have shown...

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2011-06-27 05:45:00

Researchers in Australia have found that a chemical compound typically used on heart patients may raise chances of survival for snakebite victims. The study, published in Nature Medicine, claims chemical nitric oxide can slow down, by as much as 50 percent, the time it takes for snake venom to enter the bloodstream allowing time for victims to seek medical help, said lead author Dirk van Helden, professor at the School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle in Australia. Reuters...

2011-06-06 15:38:20

Researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine have discovered a peptide that short circuits a pathway for chronic pain. Unlike current treatments this peptide does not exhibit deleterious side effects such as reduced motor coordination, memory loss, or depression, according to an article in Nature Medicine posted online June 5, 2011. The peptide, CBD3, has been shown in mice to interfere with signals that navigate calcium channels to produce pain. Unlike other substances that block...


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Nature Medicine
2012-09-24 08:10:29

Nature Medicine is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1995 and published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. As with other Nature journals, this periodical has no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team. Nature Medicine publishes research articles, reviews, news and commentary pieces. Topics include cancer, cardiovascular disease, gene therapy, immunology, vaccines, and neuroscience. Research...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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