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Latest Nature Medicine Stories

2011-03-02 12:51:32

Results suggest new vaccine strategies to debilitate viruses by tapping into this response An AIDS vaccine tested in people, but found to be ineffective, influenced the genetic makeup of the virus that slipped past. The findings suggest new ideas for developing HIV vaccines. The results were published Feb. 27 in Nature Medicine. This is the first evidence that vaccine-induced cellular immune responses against HIV-1 infection exert selective pressure on the virus. "Selective pressure" refers...

2011-01-25 13:09:58

WHAT: A team of U.S. and European researchers have found that a new vaccine strategy tested in mice provides stronger, more long-lasting protection from tuberculosis (TB) infection than the vaccine currently used in humans, known as BCG. Their findings were published online on January 23rd in the journal Nature Medicine. The study was co-funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the Bill & Melinda Gates...

2011-01-18 22:34:46

Time-lapse technique can show cellular changes related to problems like addiction and brain tumors Changes within deep regions of the brain can now be visualized at the cellular level, based on research on mice, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Published Sunday in Nature Medicine, the study used a groundbreaking technique to explore cellular-level changes over a period of weeks within deep brain regions, providing a level of detail not possible with previously available...

2011-01-17 12:34:14

UT MD Anderson preclinical research boosts case for new drug approach A small slice of RNA inhibits prostate cancer metastasis by suppressing a surface protein commonly found on prostate cancer stem cells. A research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported today in an advance online publication at Nature Medicine. "Our findings are the first to profile a microRNA expression pattern in prostate cancer stem cells and also establish a strong rationale...

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2011-01-17 10:10:00

Travel just one millimeter inside the brain and you'll be stepping into the dark. Standard light microscopes don't allow researchers to look into the interior of the living brain, where memories are formed and diseases such as dementia and cancer can take their toll. But Stanford scientists have devised a new method that not only lets them peer deep inside the brain to examine its neurons but also allows them to continue monitoring for months. The technique promises to improve understanding...

2010-12-27 13:43:25

New findings by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers may solve a 17-year-old mystery about how the so-called "starvation hormone" affects multiple biological systems, including preventing insulin sensitivity and promoting cell survival. The results connect multiple observations about how the hormone adiponectin functions and eventually could lead to new treatments for conditions ranging from diabetes and weight loss to heart disease and cancer. "Until now, there wasn't really an obvious...

2010-12-13 13:08:56

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have pinpointed a protein that compromises the kidney's filtering ability, causing nephrotic syndrome, and demonstrated that a naturally occurring precursor of an acid in the body offers potential for treating some forms of the condition. The research was published online Dec. 12 in Nature Medicine. "This is a major breakthrough in understanding the development and treatment of kidney disease associated with proteinuria, the leakage of protein...

2010-12-06 14:18:05

On November 19, Jason Martin returned to the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center for the first time since he nearly died there during last year's H1N1 flu pandemic. The tall and burly Warren County, TN, ambulance worker "“ a 30-year-old, father of three young children "“ broke down and hugged some of the nurses he recognized. "I got sick on September 12 and didn't come out of it for the next 20 days. I am just so grateful I came through,"...

2010-11-08 14:51:53

A monoclonal antibody targeting a well known cell surface protein inhibited prostate cancer growth and metastasis in an aggressive form of the disease that did not respond to hormone therapy, according to a study by researchers with the UCLA Department of Urology and UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. The researchers also found that the protein, N-cadherin, is up regulated or turned on in prostate cancer that does not respond to hormone therapy, known as castration resistant disease....

2010-10-18 13:36:48

Yale University researchers have found a gene that seems to be a key contributor to the onset of depression and is a promising target for a new class of antidepressants, they report Oct. 17 in the journal Nature Medicine. "This could be a primary cause, or at least a major contributing factor, to the signaling abnormalities that lead to depression," said Ronald S. Duman, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at Yale and senior author of the study. Scientists have had a difficult time...


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Nature Medicine
2012-09-24 08:10:29

Nature Medicine is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1995 and published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. As with other Nature journals, this periodical has no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team. Nature Medicine publishes research articles, reviews, news and commentary pieces. Topics include cancer, cardiovascular disease, gene therapy, immunology, vaccines, and neuroscience. Research...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'