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Latest Nature Medicine Stories

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2009-09-21 13:53:59

Enzyme delivered through the bloodstream corrects deficiencies in the brain The blood brain barrier is generally considered an obstacle to delivering therapies from the bloodstream to the brain. However, University of Iowa researchers have discovered a way to turn the blood vessels surrounding brain cells into a production and delivery system for getting therapeutic molecules directly into brain cells. Working with animal models of a group of fatal neurological disorders called lysosomal...

2009-09-20 13:36:25

2 genes represent potential drug targets for both heart and endocrine disease Genes previously known to be essential to the coordinated, rhythmic electrical activity of cardiac muscle -- a healthy heartbeat -- have now also been found to play a key role in thyroid hormone (TH) biosynthesis, according to Weill Cornell Medical College researchers. The authors' findings, published online this week by the peer-reviewed journal Nature Medicine, suggest that mutations of either of two gene products...

2009-09-07 06:50:33

A molecular signature that helps account for the aggressive behavior of a variety of cancers such as pancreatic, breast and melanoma may also predict the likelihood of successful treatment with a particular anti-cancer drug. The finding, which could lead to a personalized approach to treatment for a variety of solid tumors that are currently resistant to therapies, will be published September 6 in the advance online edition of Nature Medicine. Researchers at the Moores Cancer Center at the...

2009-09-07 06:43:08

UCSF researchers have successfully used protease inhibitors to restore to normal levels a key protein involved in early brain development. Reduced levels of that protein have been shown to cause the rare brain disorder lissencephaly, which is characterized by brain malformations, seizures, severe mental retardation and very early death in human infants. The findings offer a proof-of-principle, at least in mice, that the genetic equivalent to human lissencephaly, also known as "smooth brain"...

2009-08-30 13:02:04

Investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery, collaborating with researchers from other institutions, have contributed to the discovery that a gene called interferon regulator factor-8 (IRF-8) is involved in the development of diseases such as periodontitis (gum disease), rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. The study, which will be published online August 30, ahead of print, in the journal Nature Medicine, could lead to new treatments in the future. "The study doesn't have immediate...

2009-08-23 13:05:15

Study identifies pathway that helps control brain synapses A form of partial epilepsy associated with auditory and other sensory hallucinations has been linked to the disruption of brain development during early childhood, according to a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). Described in today's Advance On-line issue of Nature Medicine, these new findings provide the first genetic link between childhood brain development and a seizure disorder that lasts...

2009-08-23 12:57:57

Research published in Nature Medicine shows successful genetic and pharmacologic treatment in mice that could impact other fibrotic diseases A diagnosis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis is not much better than a death sentence: there is no treatment and the survival rate is less than three years. But researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered that targeting of a novel gene utilizing genetic and pharmacologic strategies was successful in treating pulmonary fibrosis in mice and...

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2009-08-10 12:15:00

Researchers in the laboratory of Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati at the University of Kentucky have discovered the first naturally occurring molecule that selectively blocks lymphatic vessel growth. In an article in the Aug. 9, 2009 online edition of Nature Medicine, they report the identification of a new molecule known as soluble VEGFR-2 that blocks lymphangiogenesis "“ the growth of lymphatics "“ but not blood vessel growth.The twin circulatory systems of mammals - blood and lymphatic -...

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2009-08-03 09:55:00

Researchers have discovered a new type of HIV that appears to have been transmitted from gorillas to humans. Writing in the journal Nature Medicine, Jean-Christophe Plantier of the University of Rouen, France, and his team of researchers discovered the new subtype of human immunodeficiency virus from blood tests taken from a 62-year-old woman living in Cameroon, West Africa. The woman tested positive for HIV in 2004 after she moved from Paris to Cameroon. Although scientists were able to find...

2009-08-02 12:53:46

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists have found that a population of breast cells called luminal progenitor cells are likely to be responsible for breast cancers that develop in women carrying mutations in the gene BRCA1. BRCA1 gene mutations are found in 10-20 per cent of women with hereditary breast cancer. Women with BRCA1 mutations often develop 'basal-like' breast cancer, which is a particularly aggressive form of the disease. A team led by Associate Professors Jane Visvader and...


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Nature Medicine
2012-09-24 08:10:29

Nature Medicine is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1995 and published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. As with other Nature journals, this periodical has no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team. Nature Medicine publishes research articles, reviews, news and commentary pieces. Topics include cancer, cardiovascular disease, gene therapy, immunology, vaccines, and neuroscience. Research...

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'