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Latest Nature Medicine Stories

2013-08-19 13:10:09

In animal studies, CHOP researchers advance new approach to anti-tumor immunotherapy By carefully adjusting the function of crucial immune cells, scientists may have developed a completely new type of cancer immunotherapy—harnessing the body's immune system to attack tumors. To accomplish this, they had to thread a needle in immune function, shrinking tumors without triggering unwanted autoimmune responses. The new research, performed in animals, is not ready for clinical use in...

2013-08-19 13:06:21

Rapid identification of changes in tumor blood vessels could help avoid ineffective therapies A new way of analyzing data acquired in MR imaging appears to be able to identify whether or not tumors are responding to anti-angiogenesis therapy, information that can help physicians determine the most appropriate treatments and discontinue ones that are ineffective. In their report receiving online publication in Nature Medicine, investigators from the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at...

2013-08-12 11:28:38

Proliferation of immune cells within plaques is key mechanism, potential treatment target New insights into the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques could lead to better treatment or prevention of heart attacks and strokes. In a report being published online in Nature Medicine, researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Systems Biology re-evaluated previous assumptions regarding the role of inflammatory cells in atherosclerosis and found that the...

2013-07-15 13:33:43

An international group of scientists has shown that a drug candidate designed by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) significantly increases exercise endurance in animal models. These findings could lead to new approaches to helping people with conditions that acutely limit exercise tolerance, such as obesity, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and congestive heart failure, as well as the decline of muscle capacity associated with aging....

2013-06-03 13:30:35

Penn Medicine study highlights interplay between immune system and tissue regeneration Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have determined the role of a key growth factor, found in skin cells of limited quantities in humans, which helps hair follicles form and regenerate during the wound healing process. When this growth factor, called Fgf9, was overexpressed in a mouse model, there was a two- to three-fold increase in the number of new hair...

2013-05-20 13:06:30

In the future, joint replacement surgery might be avoidable Scientists at Johns Hopkins have turned their view of osteoarthritis (OA) inside out. Literally. Instead of seeing the painful degenerative disease as a problem primarily of the cartilage that cushions joints, they now have evidence that the bone underneath the cartilage is also a key player and exacerbates the damage. In a proof-of-concept experiment, they found that blocking the action of a critical bone regulation protein in...

2013-04-23 10:33:09

Findings open new possibilities for research and testing treatments to combat obesity Joslin scientists report significant findings about the location, genetic expression and function of human brown adipose tissue (BAT) and the generation of new BAT cells. These findings, which appear in the April 2013 issue of Nature Medicine, may contribute to further study of BAT's role in human metabolism and developing treatments that use BAT to promote weight loss. Two types of adipose (fat)...

2013-03-18 10:28:27

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found that macrophages — white blood cells that play a key role in the immune response — also help to both produce and eliminate the body's red blood cells (RBCs). The findings could lead to novel therapies for diseases or conditions in which the red blood cell production is thrown out of balance. The study, conducted in mice, is published today in the...

2013-03-04 14:03:42

UT MD Anderson scientists find common vaccine ingredient diverts T cells from tumors Cancer vaccines that attempt to stimulate an immune system assault fail because the killer T cells aimed at tumors instead find the vaccination site a more inviting target, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Nature Medicine. A common substance used in many cancer vaccines to boost immune attack betrays the cause by facilitating a buildup of T cells at the...


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Nature Medicine
2012-09-24 08:10:29

Nature Medicine is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1995 and published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd. As with other Nature journals, this periodical has no external Editorial Board, with editorial decisions being made by an in-house team. Nature Medicine publishes research articles, reviews, news and commentary pieces. Topics include cancer, cardiovascular disease, gene therapy, immunology, vaccines, and neuroscience. Research...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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