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Latest Nature Nanotechnology Stories

2011-09-15 20:22:55

Nanotechnology sensor could lead to earlier diagnosis for world's deadliest form of cancer When lung cancer strikes, it often spreads silently into more advanced stages before being detected. In a new article published in Nature Nanotechnology, biological engineers and medical scientists at the University of Missouri reveal how their discovery could provide a much earlier warning signal. "Early detection can save lives, but there is currently no proven screening test available for lung...

2011-09-07 14:10:20

A group of scientists from the University of Gothenburg and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden, have become the first group in the world to demonstrate that theories about nanoscale spin waves agree with observations. This opens the way to replacing microwave technology in many applications, such as mobile phones and wireless networks, by components that are much smaller, cheaper, and that require less resources. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nature...

2011-08-24 17:40:08

A delicate balance of atomic forces can be exploited to make nanoparticle superclusters that are uniform in size–an attribute that's important for many nanotech applications but hard to accomplish, University of Michigan researchers say. The same type of forces are at work bringing the building blocks of viruses together, and the inorganic supercluster structures in this research are in many ways similar to viruses. U-M chemical engineering professors Nicholas Kotov and Sharon...

2011-08-24 11:41:15

Graphene, considered the most exciting new material under study in the world of nanotechnology, just got even more interesting, according to a new study by a group of researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder. The new findings -- that graphene has surprisingly powerful adhesion qualities -- are expected to help guide the development of graphene manufacturing and of graphene-based mechanical devices such as resonators and gas separation membranes, according to the CU-Boulder team....

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2011-08-08 14:23:36

The discovery of a fundamental, previously unknown property of microbial nanowires in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens that allows electron transport across long distances could revolutionize nanotechnology and bioelectronics, says a team of physicists and microbiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their findings reported in the Aug. 7 advance online issue of Nature Nanotechnology may one day lead to cheaper, nontoxic nanomaterials for biosensors and solid state...

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2011-07-18 08:00:15

A new technology for monitoring cellular interactions at the nano-scale provides detail never before achieved Using nanotechnology to engineer sensors onto the surface of cells, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have developed a platform technology for monitoring single-cell interactions in real-time. This innovation addresses needs in both science and medicine by providing the ability to further understand complex cell biology, track transplanted cells, and develop effective...

2011-07-11 20:08:36

University of Toronto researchers have derived inspiration from the photosynthetic apparatus in plants to engineer a new generation of nanomaterials that control and direct the energy absorbed from light. Their findings are reported in a forthcoming issue of Nature Nanotechnology, which will be released on July 10, 2011. The U of T researchers, led by Professors Shana Kelley and Ted Sargent, report the construction of what they term "artificial molecules." "Nanotechnologists have for many...

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2011-06-29 08:31:44

A microlaser no bigger than a pinprick can accurately detect and count individual viruses, the particles that jumpstart cloud formation or those that contaminate the air we breathe. By Diana Lutz, Washington University in St. Louis A tiny doughnut-shaped laser is the latest marvel of silicon microminiaturization, but instead of manipulating bits it detects very small particles. Small particles play a big "” and largely unnoticed "” role in our everyday lives. Virus particles make...

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2011-04-20 08:56:48

By Louis Bergeron, Stanford University A new biosensor microchip that could hold more than 100,000 magnetically sensitive nanosensors could speed up drug development markedly, Stanford researchers say.  The nanosensors analyze how proteins bond "“ a critical step in drug development.  The ultrasensitive sensors can simultaneously monitor thousands of times more proteins than existing technology, deliver results faster and assess the strength of the bonds. Stanford researchers...

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2011-04-19 14:12:01

A team from Pitt, UW-Madison, and HP Labs reports in Nature Nanotechnology a 1.5-nanometer single-electron transistor that could lead to long-lasting, ultradense computer memories, quantum computers, and advanced electronics A University of Pittsburgh-led team has created a single-electron transistor that provides a building block for new, more powerful computer memories, advanced electronic materials, and the basic components of quantum computers. The researchers report in Nature...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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