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Latest Nature Photonics Stories

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2010-04-02 12:16:02

A new technique for revealing images of hidden objects may one day allow pilots to peer through fog and doctors to see more precisely into the human body without surgery. Developed by Princeton engineers, the method relies on the surprising ability to clarify an image using rays of light that would typically make the image unrecognizable, such as those scattered by clouds, human tissue or murky water. In their experiments, the researchers restored an obscured image into a clear pattern of...

2010-02-15 07:51:02

University of Calgary researchers use quantum entanglement to stack light particles While many of us enjoyed constructing little houses out of toy bricks when we were kids, this task is much more difficult if bricks are elementary particles. It is even harder if these are particles of light "“ photons, which can only exist while flying at an incredible speed and vanish if they touch anything. A team at the University of Calgary has accomplished exactly that: by manipulating a mysterious...

2010-02-10 13:08:48

New step toward ultra-fast optical communications A new, more efficient low-cost microring resonator for high speed telecommunications systems has been developed and tested by Professor Roberto Morandotti's INRS team in collaboration with Canadian, American, and Australian researchers. This technological advance capitalizes on the benefits of optical fibers to transmit large quantities of data at ultra-fast speeds. The results of the team's work, just published in the prestigious journal...

2010-01-11 21:04:26

Northwestern University researchers have developed compact, mid-infrared laser diodes that generate more light than heat "” a breakthroughs in quantum cascade laser efficiency. The results are an important step toward use of quantum cascade lasers in a variety of applications, including remote sensing of hazardous chemicals. The research, led by Manijeh Razeghi, the Walter P. Murphy Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the McCormick School of Engineering and...

364eda448a75ed70c611147e594a4e061
2009-12-18 14:00:00

Nanotechnology has already made it to the shelves of your local pharmacy and grocery: nanoparticles are found in anti-odor socks, makeup, makeup remover, sunscreen, anti-graffiti paint, home pregnancy tests, plastic beer bottles, anti-bacterial doorknobs, plastic bags for storing vegetables, and more than 800 other products. How safe are these products and the flood of new ones about to spill out of labs across the world? A group of researchers at Washington University is devising instruments...

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2009-12-07 10:35:00

MIT researchers have developed a new way to tune the frequency of lasers that operate in the terahertz spectrum. The result is an important step toward airport scanners that could tell whether a vial in a closed suitcase contains aspirin, methamphetamines or an explosive. Tucked between microwaves and infrared rays on the electromagnetic spectrum, terahertz rays can penetrate clothing, plastic, and human tissue, but they're thought to be safer than x-rays. Since they're absorbed to different...

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2009-10-26 10:30:00

The next generation of optical devices could borrow inspiration from the spectacular eyes of the mantis shrimp. Reporting in Nature Photonics, researchers from the University of Bristol said mantis shrimps from the Australia's Great Barrier Reef have the most complex eyes known to man. The shrimp's eyes can see in twelve colors and distinguish between different forms of polarized light. By comparison, humans can only see in three colors. Researchers said the marine crustaceans' have special...

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2009-09-28 06:55:00

Physicists at UC San Diego have successfully created speedy integrated circuits with particles called "excitons" that operate at commercially cold temperatures, bringing the possibility of a new type of extremely fast computer based on excitons closer to reality. Their discovery, detailed this week in the advance online issue of the journal Nature Photonics, follows the team's demonstration last summer of an integrated circuit"”an assembly of transistors that is the building block for...

2009-04-22 13:37:08

U.S. scientists say they've developed a light imaging technology that could lead to creation of more powerful microscopes and other optical devices. Princeton University researchers said when photographers zoom in on an object to see it better, they lose the wide-angle perspective -- they are forced to trade off big picture context for detail. The scientists say their new imaging method might also lead to lenses that show all parts of a scene at once in the same high detail. It allows you to...

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2008-12-22 13:11:40

A Princeton-led team of researchers has discovered an entirely new mechanism for making common electronic materials emit laser beams. The finding could lead to lasers that operate more efficiently and at higher temperatures than existing devices, and find applications in environmental monitoring and medical diagnostics. "This discovery provides a new insight into the physics of lasers," said Claire Gmachl, who led the study. Gmachl, an electrical engineer, is the director of the Mid-Infrared...


Latest Nature Photonics Reference Libraries

Nature Photonics
2012-09-24 08:13:04

Nature Photonics is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 2007 and published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group. As with other Nature journals, this periodical has no external Editorial Board with editorial decisions made by a fully-functioning in-house team. The journal covers research related to optoelectronics, laser science, imaging, communications, and other aspects of photonics. It publishes review articles, research papers, news and commentary, and research...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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