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Genomic Analysis Confirms Interbreeding Between Humans And

Genomic Analysis Confirms Interbreeding Between Humans And Neanderthals

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Whether or not early humans and Neanderthals interbred has been the subject of much debate in scientific circles for a long time. Thanks to a new genomic analysis method from the University...

Latest Neanderthal extinction hypotheses Stories

Neanderthals Buried Their Dead
2013-12-17 07:44:47

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A 50,000-year-old Neanderthal skeleton discovered in a cave in southwestern France was intentionally buried, a finding that confirms burials took place in Western Europe prior to the arrival of modern humans. “This discovery not only confirms the existence of Neanderthal burials in Western Europe, but also reveals a relatively sophisticated cognitive capacity to produce them,” said William Rendu, the study’s lead author and...

Neanderthals Organized Their homes
2013-12-03 12:48:13

[ Watch the Video: Clean Your Room, Neanderthal! ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Neanderthals possessed organizational skills similar to modern humans, showing yet another similarity between us and our ancient cousins. Researchers writing in the Canadian Journal of Archaeology say they found that Neanderthals organized their living spaces in ways similar to modern humans. They say that the sub-species of Homo sapiens butchered animals, made tools and gathered around...

Could Neanderthals Have Been the First Cave Artists?
2012-06-15 07:10:15

By using a new cutting-edge dating technique, researchers have discovered that the practice of painting cave art started as early as 40,000 years ago, or 10,000 years earlier than previously believed. A team of British, Spanish and Portuguese researchers, led by Dr. Alistair Pike of the University of Bristol, investigated some 50 paintings in 11 different caves in northern Spain. Since the paintings had no organic pigment, they could not use radiocarbon dating to determine their age, so...

Image 1 - Were European Neanderthals Long Gone Before Humans Arrived?
2012-03-27 04:47:12

New research suggests Western European Neanderthals were likely to have been extinct long before humans arrived on the evolutionary scene. Long thought to be the birth place of Neanderthal evolution, Western Europe has been studied and researched by scientists and anthropologists to better understand our ancient forefathers. As these Neanderthals began to disappear around 30,000 years ago, anthropologists had estimated either climate changes or competition from early humans caused the...

European Neanderthals We Already Close To Extinction Before Arrival Of Modern Humans
2012-02-27 11:42:15

New findings from an international team of researchers show that most Neanderthals in Europe died off around 50,000 years ago. The previously held view of a Europe populated by a stable Neanderthal population for hundreds of thousands of years up until modern humans arrived must therefore be revised. This new perspective on the Neanderthals comes from a study of ancient DNA published Feb 25 in Molecular Biology and Evolution. The results indicate that most Neanderthals in Europe died off...

Genetic Mixing, Not Extinction, Led To Neanderthals' Demise
2012-02-08 06:07:35

Rather than being physically wiped out, a new study suggests that Neanderthals were likely integrated into the gene pool of early humans after the two groups crossed paths and began interbreeding. The new study, published in the journal Advances in Complex Systems (ACS), was written by C. Michael Barton of Arizona State University (ASU) and Julien Riel-Salvatore of the University of Colorado Denver, and "builds on work published last year in the journal Human Ecology and on recent genetic...

Ice Age Hominins And Their Adaptability To Climate Change
2011-11-17 10:07:33

Complex computational modeling provides clues to Neanderthal extinction Computational modeling that examines evidence of how hominin groups evolved culturally and biologically in response to climate change during the last Ice Age also bears new insights into the extinction of Neanderthals. Details of the complex modeling experiments conducted at Arizona State University and the University of Colorado Denver will be published in the December issue of the journal Human Ecology, available...

Humans Didn’t Often Mate With Neanderthals
2011-09-14 08:56:16

  Modern humans do show some traces of DNA from Neanderthals, but a new study from Swiss researchers suggests that any breeding between the two was a relatively rare event. The new model, based on DNA samples from modern humans in France and China, shows that successful breeding between the two species occurred at a rate of less than 2 percent, according to researchers at the University of Geneva and the University of Berne in Switzerland. The research, published Monday in the...

Evolution's Past Is Modern Human's Present
2011-09-08 05:02:13

  Mandenka, Biaka and San tested for DNA evidence of ancient interbreeding inside Africa The past is present when it comes to human evolution. That seems to be the takeaway from new research that concludes "archaic" humans, somewhere in Africa during the last 20-60 thousand years, interbred with anatomically modern humans and transferred small amounts of genetic material to their offspring who are alive today. University of Arizona geneticist Michael Hammer and a team of...