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Latest Nectar Stories

Flower Blasts Pollen At Birds
2014-07-04 03:22:40

Cell Press A small tree or shrub found in mountainous Central and South American rainforests has a most unusual relationship with the birds that pollinate its flowers, according to a study reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 3. The plant known as Axinaea offers up its male reproductive organs as a tempting and nutritious food source for the birds. As the birds seize those bulbous stamens with their beaks, they are blasted with pollen by the flowers' complex...

Flowering Plants Need Sugar Transporter SWEET9 For Nectar Production
2014-03-17 10:58:21

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Evolution is based on diversity, and sexual reproduction is key to creating a diverse population that secures competitiveness in nature. Plants as largely immobile organisms had to solve a problem: they needed to find ways to spread their genetic material beyond individual flowers. To make sure that flying pollinators such as insects, birds and bats come to the flowers to pick up pollen, plants evolved special organs, the nectaries, to attract and...

2014-01-10 23:02:15

In-demand research report “Global Juice Report 2013” worked out by Canadean has been recently published by Market Publishers Ltd. According to the study, pure juice is gradually losing its share to nectars. London, UK (PRWEB) January 10, 2014 The volume gap between nectars and pure juice is constantly tightening given the sustained growth of demand for nectars, driven by such benefits of the product as lower sugar content, reasonable prices, reduced acidity levels, and a wider flavor...

Bats Get Tongue Erections
2013-05-07 08:31:33

Watch the video "A Dynamic Nectar Mop" April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online What do busy janitors and nectar feeding bats have in common?  They both want to wipe up as much liquid as they can, as fast as they can. And it turns out, they both have specialized equipment for the job. A new study, led by Brown University, describes the previously undiscovered mechanism used by the bat, Glossophaga soricina, to slurp up extra nectar from within a flower: a tongue tip...

Flower's Nectar Content Changed By Ants
2013-04-25 13:55:58

American Journal of Botany Ants foraging on nectar transmit yeasts that change sugar-chemistry and may affect subsequent pollinator visitations and plant fitness Ants play a variety of important roles in many ecosystems. As frequent visitors to flowers, they can benefit plants in their role as pollinators when they forage on sugar-rich nectar. However, a new study reveals that this mutualistic relationship may actually have some hidden costs. By transmitting sugar-eating yeasts to the...

Bumblebees Threatened By Metal Toxins In Flowers
2013-04-03 08:07:00

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Across the US beekeepers and researchers have been reporting that a powerful new class of pesticides may be killing off bumblebees. A new study, led by the University of Pittsburgh, pinpoints another potential cause: metal pollution in flowers from aluminum and nickel. The study findings, published in the journal Environmental Pollution, reveal that bumblebees are at risk of ingesting toxic amounts of metals such as nickel and...

2013-03-09 23:02:00

SunTropics will attend the 15th Annual Shamrock 5K Fun Run and Walk in Dublin, California on Sunday, March 17, 2013 and will be on hand at the finish line with samples of their all natural fruit juices. Dublin, CA (PRWEB) March 09, 2013 To celebrate St. Patrick´s Day, beverage distributor SunTropics will be at the finish line for the 15th Annual Shamrock 5K Fun Run and Walk in Dublin, California. Taking place on Sunday, March 17, 2013, this family-friendly event is designed for runners...

Electric Flowers Help Bees Pick Up Pollen
2013-02-22 11:25:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Previous research has shown that bees build up an electrical charge as they buzz through the air, but a new study from the University of Bristol in the U.K. has shown that the bees are able to use this charge to interact with nectar-bearing flowers. According to a summary of the study recently published in the journal Science, the British scientists showed that flowers actually modify their own electrical fields to attract the flying...

2012-11-21 15:06:30

How flowers have evolved particular colors, shapes and scents to attract pollinators has long fascinated ecologists. Now, using artificial flowers and high-speed video, researchers have gained intriguing insights into the intimate relationship between hummingbirds and the flowers they pollinate. The study, published in the British Ecological Society's journal Functional Ecology, is the first to measure how much energy hummingbirds use while hovering to feed from flowers of different...

2012-08-01 23:06:21

Insects learn faster when they are rewarded with nectar Butterflies learn faster when a flower is rewarding than when it is not, and females have the edge over males when it comes to speed of learning with rewards. These are the findings of a new study, by Dr. Ikuo Kandori and Takafumi Yamaki from Kinki University in Japan. Their work, published online in Springer's journal Naturwissenschaften - The Science of Nature, is the first to investigate and compare the speed at which insects learn...


Latest Nectar Reference Libraries

38_2fbcfc43bbc8904401d88cf626e04906
2009-02-16 18:16:45

The Kinkajou (Potos flavus), also known as the Honey Bear, is a species of mammal found in the rainforests of Central and South America. It is the only member of the family genus Potos. It is related to the olingo, ringtail, cacomistle, raccoon, and coati. These animals are sometimes mistaken for ferrets or monkeys, but are not related. The name Honey Bear is derived from the fact that in captivity it will eat honey, however, in the wild it has never been observed to do so. An adult...

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'