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Latest Neglected diseases Stories

2011-10-17 10:16:39

Researchers in South East Asia have identified two genetic variants associated with increased susceptibility to severe dengue. The study, funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research, Singapore, offers clues to how the body responds to dengue infection. Dengue is globally the most common mosquito-borne infection after malaria, with an estimated 100 million infections occurring annually. Symptoms range from mild to incapacitating high fever, with...

2011-10-10 09:25:53

NIH - developed vaccine based on live, attenuated Chlamydia bacteria An attenuated, or weakened, strain of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria can be used as a vaccine to prevent or reduce the severity of trachoma, the world's leading cause of infectious blindness, suggest findings from a National Institutes of Health study in monkeys. "This work is an important milestone in the development of a trachoma vaccine," noted Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy...

Image 1 - Chagas Disease May Be A Threat In South Texas
2011-10-06 11:15:40

Epidemiological maps suggest South Texas, in particular, is an area of high risk for infection Chagas disease, a tropical parasitic disease that can lead to life-threatening heart and digestive disorders, may be more widespread in Texas than previously thought, according to research from The University of Texas at Austin. "We've been studying this for four years now, and this year the number of disease-causing insects is quite amazing," says Sahotra Sarkar, professor of integrative...

Researchers Study Flight Patterns Of Mosquitoes
2011-10-01 07:27:04

Experiments by University of California Riverside entomologists demonstrate mosquitoes are attracted first to carbon dioxide, then to skin odors; findings could lead to more effective mosquito traps The carbon dioxide we exhale and the odors our skins emanate serve as crucial cues to female mosquitoes on the hunt for human hosts to bite and spread diseases such as malaria, dengue and yellow fever. Two entomologists at the University of California, Riverside have now performed...

2011-09-28 10:16:44

Researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have for the first time identified a 'programmed cell death' pathway in parasitic worms that could one day lead to new treatments for one of the world's most serious and prevalent diseases. Dr Erinna Lee and Dr Doug Fairlie from the institute's Structural Biology division study programmed cell death (also called apoptosis) in human cells. They have recently started studying the process in schistosomes, parasitic fluke worms responsible...

2011-09-28 09:43:20

High rates of parasitic infection in the region nearly 20 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union The open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases will publish an article emphasizing the rising burden of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) in Central Asia on Tuesday, Sept. 27th. According to the article's co-authors, Dr. Peter Hotez, President of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, and Dr. Ken Alibek of Nazarbayev University in Astana, Kazakhstan, the region continues to suffer from a...


Latest Neglected diseases Reference Libraries

Giant Roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The giant roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) is a parasitic worm within the Nematoda phylum. This species can be found throughout the world, but occurs in higher numbers in tropical and subtropical areas. It causes the disease known as ascariasis in its human hosts and infects about one quarter of the entire world’s human population. It displays a sexual dimorphism, with females growing larger than males. Females reach an average body length between 7.8 and 19.2 inches, while males reach a...

Wuchereria bancrofti
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Wuchereria bancrofti is a species of roundworm in the Nematoda phylum. This species is spread through a mosquito vector, which means that it is transferred through mosquitos. This species infects over 120 million people in South America, Africa, and other tropical and subtropical areas. It is one of three species of parasitic worm that can cause lymphatic filariasis, which can lead to elephantiasis. The disease is wrongfully named, because the term translates to “a disease caused by...

Wuchereria bancrofti
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Wuchereria bancrofti is a species of roundworm in the Nematoda phylum. This species is spread through a mosquito vector, which means that it is transferred through mosquitos. This species infects over 120 million people in South America, Africa, and other tropical and subtropical areas. It is one of three species of parasitic worm that can cause lymphatic filariasis, which can lead to elephantiasis. The disease is wrongfully named, because the term translates to “a disease caused by...

0_57c89d5bd133fff5bf10b17b705f87c1
2011-03-04 17:38:30

Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease with a 40 to 50 nm enveloped RNA virus with positive sense of the Flaviviridae family. It is transmitted by the bite of female mosquitoes and is found in tropical and subtropical areas in South America and Africa, but not in Asia. Primates and a few kinds of mosquitoes are the only known hosts. The origin of the disease is most likely Africa. From there it was introduced to South America through the slave trade in the 16th century. There...

69_91adf9a2d64d7fdcac1a7b084facc7ac
2011-01-12 16:33:15

Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), caused by the dengue virus, is among the spectrum of acute febrile tropical disease and is transmitted by mosquitoes. Occurring mainly in the tropics it can be life threatening and is caused by four closely related virus stereotypes of the genus Flavivirus. It was identified and named in 1779. It has a nickname of "breakbone fever" due to it causing sever generalized bodyache. It tends to be more prevalent in the urban districts of its range...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'