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Latest neonatal jaundice Stories

2013-06-10 10:26:15

Helping to protect newborns and older patients against more severe effects of jaundice is the hope of University of Guelph researchers, who have shown how a liver enzyme protects cells from damage caused by the condition. Their discovery might ultimately lead to an alternative treatment for jaundice, such as a new drug or supplement, says Daniel Kim, a research technician in Guelph's Department of Biomedical Sciences. He is lead author of a paper published recently in the journal...

Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping Protects Babies From Iron Deficiency
2011-11-16 12:19:53

According to new research, waiting at least three minutes before clamping the umbilical cord of a newborn baby improves their iron levels at four months. The study said that delaying cord clamping is not linked to neonatal jaundice or other adverse health effects and should be standard care after uncomplicated pregnancies. Although other research indicates that delayed cord clamping could prevent iron deficiency, these studies had conflicting results regarding the risk of neonatal...

2011-02-15 19:59:18

An analysis of data including more than 500,000 adults indicates that levels in the blood of bilirubin (a compound produced by the breakdown of hemoglobin from red blood cells) in the normal range but relatively higher were associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and all-cause death, according to a study in the February 16 issue of JAMA. Serum total bilirubin is routinely measured in the primary care setting to identify hepatobiliary (liver, gall...

2010-06-06 14:00:00

CHICAGO, June 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists from the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University School of Medicine, both in Detroit, and the Children's Hospital of Michigan/Detroit Medical Center, presented preliminary data that identified a potential link between Gilbert's Syndrome and the development of a specific subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The findings were announced today at the 2010 American Society of Clinical Oncology...

2009-09-28 06:00:00

ROCKVILLE, Md., Sept. 28 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- According to a new recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, there is insufficient evidence to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening infants for hyperbilirubinemia to prevent chronic bilirubin encephalopathy. Hyperbilirubinemia is a condition marked by a high level of bilirubin in the blood, which is often apparent as yellow-colored skin and eyes (jaundice). This recommendation and the accompanying...

2009-09-28 07:27:38

Screening all newborns for excessive bilirubin in the blood can significantly decrease the incidence of severe jaundice which, in extreme cases, can lead to seizures and brain damage, according to researchers at UCSF Children's Hospital and Kaiser Permanente's Division of Research in Oakland, CA. The study, one of the first to examine the effectiveness of universal screening for hyperbilirubinemia, appears in the current issue of "Pediatrics," the official journal of the American Academy of...

2009-07-27 14:32:36

Following American Academy of Pediatrics (www.aap.org) guidelines for monitoring and diagnosing newborn jaundice or hyperbilirubinemia can result in better treatment and fewer cases of kernicterus, a form of brain damage caused by excessive jaundice, said a health services researcher at Baylor College of Medicine (www.bcm.edu) in a report that appears in the current issue of Pediatrics. "Little is known about how well pediatricians follow these guidelines," said the study's lead author Dr....

2009-03-23 15:35:00

Study Challenges Common Medical Practice PHILADELPHIA, March 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- For hundreds of years, doctors, nurses and midwives have visually examined newborn babies for the yellowish skin tones that signify jaundice, judging that more extensive jaundice carried a greater risk of illness. The yellowness comes from a blood byproduct, bilirubin, and a child that develops high levels of bilirubin has a potentially serious condition called hyperbilirubinemia. Now pediatric...

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2008-10-30 14:50:01

Two studies published on Wednesday suggest that some of the intense care given to the smallest premature infants may be a little too intense. Light treatment for jaundice may overwhelm the smallest infants, one study said, while another questions the practice of giving insulin to premature newborns. Babies weighing less than 2 pounds (1 kg) were slightly more likely to die if they were given early light therapy for rising levels of bilirubin, the compound that can turn the skin yellow but,...

2008-09-26 18:00:59

Five years ago today, Kim and Thomas Champion welcomed their healthy daughter, Jessie, into the world. Within days of birth, Jessie developed severe jaundice, a common, but potentially life-threatening, condition when left untreated. Her doctors failed to test and treat her jaundice, which developed into kernicterus, a preventable, lifelong, debilitating, neurological syndrome. Jessie now suffers from numerous disabilities including quadriplegic cerebral palsy, severe motor skills impairment,...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'