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Latest Nerve Stories

Surgery Returns Hand’s Function After Spinal Cord Injury
2012-05-16 04:50:22

[ Watch the Video ] Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com Surgeons at Washington State University in St. Louis recently revealed that they were able to restore some hand function in a quadriplegic patient who suffered from a spinal cord injury at the C7 Vertebra, which is the lowest bone in the neck. They were able to reroute the working nerves in the arms instead of operating on the spine. The nerves are able to communicate with the brain because they´re attached to the part of the spine...

2012-05-15 21:04:53

Technique could help those with C6, C7 spinal cord injuries Surgeons at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have restored some hand function in a quadriplegic patient with a spinal cord injury at the C7 vertebra, the lowest bone in the neck. Instead of operating on the spine itself, the surgeons rerouted working nerves in the upper arms. These nerves still "talk" to the brain because they attach to the spine above the injury. Following the surgery, performed at...

2012-05-15 21:02:42

A plastic surgeon and neurosurgeon at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis were successful in using peripheral nerve transfer to bypass a cervical spinal cord injury and restore partial function in both hands in a 71-year-old man. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of reactivation of muscles in thumb and fingers after spinal cord injury. The surgical procedures are described in the article "Nerve transfers for the restoration of hand function after spinal...

2012-05-10 14:00:27

Glial cells pass on metabolites to neurons Around 100 billion neurons in the human brain enable us to think, feel and act. They transmit electrical impulses to remote parts of the brain and body via long nerve fibers known as axons. This communication requires enormous amounts of energy, which the neurons are thought to generate from sugar. Axons are closely associated with glial cells which, on the one hand, surround them with an electrically insulating myelin sheath and, on the other...

2012-04-23 12:52:28

Engineers at the University of Sheffield have developed a method of assisting nerves damaged by traumatic accidents to repair naturally, which could improve the chances of restoring sensation and movement in injured limbs. In a collaborative study with Laser Zentrum Hannover (Germany) published today (23 April 2012) in the journal Biofabrication, the team describes a new method for making medical devices called nerve guidance conduits or NGCs. The method is based on laser direct...

2012-04-18 10:31:05

Women are more prone to knee injuries than men, and the findings of a new study suggest this may involve more than just differences in muscular and skeletal structure — it shows that males and females also differ in the way they transmit the nerve impulses that control muscle force. Scientists at Oregon State University found that men control nerve impulses similar to individuals trained for explosive muscle usage — like those of a sprinter — while the nerve impulses of...

2012-04-02 10:04:42

A new animal model of nerve injury has brought to light a critical role of an enzyme called Nmnat in nerve fiber maintenance and neuroprotection. Understanding biological pathways involved in maintaining healthy nerves and clearing away damaged ones may offer scientists targets for drugs to mitigate neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's, as well as aid in situations of acute nerve damage, such as spinal cord injury. University of Pennsylvanian biologists developed...

2012-03-29 23:17:32

Proteins important in embryos found to change the adult brain Certain genes and proteins that promote growth and development of embryos also play a surprising role in sending chemical signals that help adults learn, remember, forget and perhaps become addicted, University of Utah biologists have discovered. "We found that these molecules and signaling pathways [named Wnt] do not retire after development of the organism, but have a new and surprising role in the adult. They are called...

2012-02-22 12:15:02

Sandia National Laboratories researchers, using off-the-shelf equipment in a chemistry lab, have been working on ways to improve amputees´ control over prosthetics with direct help from their own nervous systems. Organic materials chemist Shawn Dirk, robotics engineer Steve Buerger and others are creating biocompatible interface scaffolds. The goal is improved prosthetics with flexible nerve-to-nerve or nerve-to-muscle interfaces through which transected nerves can grow, putting small...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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