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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 17:20 EDT
New Memory Model Explains How Neurons Select Memories

New Memory Model Explains How Neurons Select Memories

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In research that should provide a more detailed picture of how memory works, scientists from the Salk Institute have developed a new model explaining how neurons retain select memories a...

Latest Nervous system Stories

2014-04-19 23:01:15

In noting Bicycle Day 2014, author Bryan W. Brickner tells the story of Albert Hoffman’s first intentional use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) through the lens of serotonin, the neurotransmitter system LSD modulates. PubMed provides the quotes and science for an immune dialogue, an early life tale, circadian clock notes and bowels (irritable and otherwise). Chicago, IL (PRWEB) April 19, 2014 “Serotonin has a synaptic transmission,” opened Bryan W. Brickner, “and 71 years ago...

2014-04-18 09:59:31

Attack by own immune system may kill neurons in Parkinson's disease The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. The study was published April 16, 2014, in Nature Communications. "This is a new, and likely controversial,...

2014-04-16 23:10:26

AxoGen, Inc. will report results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2014 on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 after the market closes. Alachua, Florida (PRWEB) April 16, 2014 AxoGen, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXGN), the emerging leader of the $1.6 billion U.S. peripheral nerve repair market, will report results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2014 on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 after the market closes. The Company will host a conference call and webcast for the investment community on Wednesday, April...

2014-04-16 23:10:07

iSuperLearn (http://www.iSuperLearn.com), the leading online review system for medical professionals, is releasing its expert opinion on studies backing up the assertion that sleep learning can significantly increase one’s chances of passing the NCLEX and other examinations. Hollywood, FL (PRWEB) April 16, 2014 iSuperLearn (http://www.iSuperLearn.com), the leading online review system for medical professionals, is releasing its expert opinion on studies backing up the assertion that...

2014-04-11 10:16:28

To accommodate a lifetime of scents and aromas, mammals have hundreds of genes that each produce a different odorant receptor. The complex and diverse olfactory system they build remains adaptable, but a new study in the journal Science shows that the system's flexibility, or plasticity, has its limits. Working in mice, Brown University scientists found that the fundamental neural wiring map between the nose and the brain becomes established in a critical period of early development and then...

2014-04-11 10:13:44

Stowers investigators reveal a developmental switch in targeting capacity of olfactory neurons The human nose expresses nearly 400 odorant receptors, which allow us to distinguish a large number of scents. In mice the number of odor receptors is closer to 1000. Each olfactory neuron displays only a single type of receptor and all neurons with the same receptors are connected to the same spot, a glomerulus, in the brain. This convergence, or wiring pattern, is often described as an...

2014-04-09 12:31:24

iTherapy announces a 50% off sale of InnerVoice for the entire Autism Awareness Month of April MARTINEZ, Calif., April 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- How can using 3D-animated avatars help improve communication? Read more and find out! (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140409/PH01792-a ) (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140409/PH01792-b ) Communication challenges are at the core of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To tackle this challenge, iTherapy used the expertise of...

2014-04-08 11:48:00

New research from University of Liverpool scientists has cast doubt on the theory that neurological behavior is a product of culture in people of Chinese origin. Scientists tested three groups – students from mainland China, British people with Chinese parents and white British people – to see how quickly their eyes reacted to dots appearing in the periphery of their vision. These rapid eye movements, known as saccades, were timed in all of the participants to see which of them were...

2014-04-07 16:00:28

A study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has helped solve a long-standing mystery about the sense of touch. The "gentle touch" sensations that convey the stroke of a finger, the fine texture of something grasped and the light pressure of a breeze on the skin are brought to us by nerves that often terminate against special skin cells called Merkel cells. These skin cells' role in touch sensation has long been debated in the scientific community. The new study,...

2014-04-07 10:57:39

A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralyzed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King’s College London. The technique involves transplanting specially-designed motor neurons created from stem cells into injured nerve branches. These motor neurons are designed to react to pulses of blue light, allowing scientists to fine-tune muscle control by...


Latest Nervous system Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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