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Latest Nestle Prepared Foods Company Stories

2011-01-31 13:27:00

SOLON, Ohio, Jan. 31, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Nestle Prepared Foods Company is dedicated to providing convenient, wholesome and delicious foods. The most recent example of the company's ongoing efforts to provide great taste with wholesome nutrition is STOUFFER'S® FARMERS' HARVEST(TM) entrees. With STOUFFER'S® FARMERS' HARVEST(TM), you can have good, wholesome food and enjoy eating it too. This new line features three family size entrees and seven...

2010-11-08 08:00:00

BOSTON, Nov. 8, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Nestle Prepared Foods Company has announced a comprehensive plan to decrease the sodium content in its products by another 10 percent from reductions made earlier this decade. This major initiative will carry through 2015 and includes the company's popular STOUFFER'S®, LEAN CUISINE®, BUITONI®, HOT POCKETS® and LEAN POCKETS® brands which will undergo gradual but...

2010-10-22 08:30:00

NEW YORK, Oct. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- Nestle Prepared Foods Company today announced a comprehensive plan to decrease the sodium content in its products by another 10 percent from reductions made earlier this decade. This major initiative will carry through 2015 and includes the company's popular STOUFFER'S®, LEAN CUISINE®, BUITONI®, HOT POCKETS® and LEAN POCKETS® brands which will undergo gradual but...

2009-12-15 13:03:00

SOLON, Ohio, Dec. 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Nestle Prepared Foods Company President and CEO, Angelo Iantosca, today announced that the STOUFFER'S® brand will adopt new paperboard packaging in its STOUFFER'S Family and Large Family Size multi-serve products. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20091215/SF26485) "Our company is always searching for efficiencies and ways to reduce our impact on the environment. One area we've explored is converting CPET, or plastic,...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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